Deploying Spring Boot Apps to AWS with Netflix Nebula and Spinnaker: Part 1 of 2

Listening to DevOps industry pundits, you might be convinced everyone is running containers in Production (or by now, serverless). Although containerization is growing at a phenomenal rate, several recent surveys¹ indicate less than 50% of enterprises are deploying containers in Production. Filter those results further with the fact, of those enterprises, only a small percentage of their total application portfolios are containerized, let alone in Production.

As a DevOps Consultant, I regularly work with corporations whose global portfolios are in the thousands of applications. Indeed, some percentage of their applications are containerized, with less running in Production. However, a majority of those applications, even those built on modern, light-weight, distributed architectures, are still being deployed to bare-metal and virtualized public cloud and private data center infrastructure, for a variety of reasons.

Enterprise Deployment

Due to the scale and complexity of application portfolios, many organizations have invested in enterprise deployment tools, either commercially available or developed in-house. The enterprise deployment tool’s primary objective is to standardize the process of securely, reliably, and repeatably packaging, publishing, and deploying both containerized and non-containerized applications to large fleets of virtual machines and bare-metal servers, across multiple, geographically dispersed data centers and cloud providers. Enterprise deployment tools are particularly common in tightly regulated and compliance-driven organizations, as well as organizations that have undertaken large amounts of M&A, resulting in vastly different application technology stacks.

Enterprise CI/CD/Release Workflow

Better-known examples of commercially available enterprise deployment tools include IBM UrbanCode Deploy (aka uDeploy), XebiaLabs XL Deploy, CA Automic Release Automation, Octopus Deploy, and Electric Cloud ElectricFlow. While commercial tools continue to gain market share³, many organizations are tightly coupled to their in-house solutions through years of use and fear of widespread process disruption, given current economic, security, compliance, and skills-gap sensitivities.

Deployment Tool Anatomy

Most Enterprise deployment tools are compatible with standard binary package types, including Debian (.deb) and Red Hat  (RPM) Package Manager (.rpm) packages for Linux, NuGet (.nupkg) packages for Windows, and Node Package Manager (.npm) and Bower for JavaScript. There are equivalent package types for other popular languages and formats, such as Go, Python, Ruby, SQL, Android, Objective-C, Swift, and Docker. Packages usually contain application metadata, a signature to ensure the integrity and/or authenticity², and a compressed payload.

Enterprise deployment tools are normally integrated with open-source packaging and publishing tools, such as Apache Maven, Apache Ivy/Ant, Gradle, NPMNuGet, BundlerPIP, and Docker.

Binary packages (and images), built with enterprise deployment tools, are typically stored in private, open-source or commercial binary (artifact) repositories, such as SpacewalkJFrog Artifactory, and Sonatype Nexus Repository. The latter two, Artifactory and Nexus, support a multitude of modern package types and repository structures, including Maven, NuGet, PyPI, NPM, Bower, Ruby Gems, CocoaPods, Puppet, Chef, and Docker.

Mature binary repositories provide many features in addition to package management, including role-based access control, vulnerability scanning, rich APIs, DevOps integration, and fault-tolerant, high-availability architectures.

Lastly, enterprise deployment tools generally rely on standard package management systems to retrieve and install cryptographically verifiable packages and images. These include YUM (Yellowdog Updater, Modified), APT (aptitude), APK (Alpine Linux), NuGet, Chocolatey, NPM, PIP, Bundler, and Docker. Packages are deployed directly to running infrastructure, or indirectly to intermediate deployable components as Amazon Machine Images (AMI), Google Compute Engine machine images, VMware machines, Docker Images, or CoreOS rkt.

Open-Source Alternative

One such enterprise with an extensive portfolio of both containerized and non-containerized applications is Netflix. To standardize their deployments to multiple types of cloud infrastructure, Netflix has developed several well-known open-source software (OSS) tools, including the Nebula Gradle plugins and Spinnaker. I discussed Spinnaker in my previous post, Managing Applications Across Multiple Kubernetes Environments with Istio, as an alternative to Jenkins for deploying container workloads to Kubernetes on Google (GKE).

As a leader in OSS, Netflix has documented their deployment process in several articles and presentations, including a post from 2016, ‘How We Build Code at Netflix.’ According to the article, the high-level process for deployment to Amazon EC2 instances involves the following steps:

  • Code is built and tested locally using Nebula
  • Changes are committed to a central git repository
  • Jenkins job executes Nebula, which builds, tests, and packages the application for deployment
  • Builds are “baked” into Amazon Machine Images (using Spinnaker)
  • Spinnaker pipelines are used to deploy and promote the code change

The Nebula plugins and Spinnaker leverage many underlying, open-source technologies, including Pivotal Spring, Java, Groovy, Gradle, Maven, Apache Commons, Redline RPM, HashiCorp Packer, Redis, HashiCorp Consul, Cassandra, and Apache Thrift.

Both the Nebula plugins and Spinnaker have been battle tested in Production by Netflix, as well as by many other industry leaders after Netflix open-sourced the tools in 2014 (Nebula) and 2015 (Spinnaker). Currently, there are approximately 20 Nebula Gradle plugins available on GitHub. Notable core-contributors in the development of Spinnaker include Google, Microsoft, Pivotal, Target, Veritas, and Oracle, to name a few. A sign of its success, Spinnaker currently has over 4,600 Stars on GitHub!

Part Two: Demonstration

In Part Two, we will deploy a production-ready Spring Boot application, the Election microservice, to multiple Amazon EC2 instances, behind an Elastic Load Balancer (ELB). We will use a fully automated DevOps workflow. The build, test, package, bake, deploy process will be handled by the Netflix Nebula Gradle Linux Packaging Plugin, Jenkins, and Spinnaker. The high-level process will involve the following steps:

  • Configure Gradle to build a production-ready fully executable application for Unix systems (executable JAR)
  • Using deb-s3 and GPG Suite, create a secure, signed APT (Debian) repository on Amazon S3
  • Using Jenkins and the Netflix Nebula plugin, build a Debian package, containing the executable JAR and configuration files
  • Using Jenkins and deb-s3, publish the package to the S3-based APT repository
  • Using Spinnaker (HashiCorp Packer under the covers), bake an Ubuntu Amazon Machine Image (AMI), replete with the executable JAR installed from the Debian package
  • Deploy an auto-scaling set of Amazon EC2 instances from the baked AMI, behind an ELB, running the Spring Boot application using both the Red/Black and Highlander deployment strategies
  • Be able to repeat the entire automated build, test, package, bake, deploy process, triggered by a new code push to GitHub

The overall build, test, package, bake, deploy process will look as follows.

DebianPackageWorkflow12

References

 

All opinions expressed in this post are my own and not necessarily the views of my current or past employers or their clients.

¹ Recent Surveys: ForresterPortworx,  Cloud Foundry Survey
² Courtesy Wikipedia – rpm
³ XebiaLabs Kicks Off 2017 with Triple-Digit Growth in Enterprise DevOps

, , , , , , , , , , , ,

  1. Deploying Spring Boot Apps to AWS with Netflix Nebula and Spinnaker: Part 2 of 2 | Programmatic Ponderings

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: