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Building Serverless Actions for Google Assistant with Google Cloud Functions, Cloud Datastore, and Cloud Storage

Introduction

In this post, we will create an Action for Google Assistant using the ‘Actions on Google’ development platform, Google Cloud Platform’s serverless Cloud Functions, Cloud Datastore, and Cloud Storage, and the current LTS version of Node.js. According to Google, Actions are pieces of software, designed to extend the functionality of the Google Assistant, Google’s virtual personal assistant, across a multitude of Google-enabled devices, including smartphones, cars, televisions, headphones, watches, and smart-speakers.

Here is a brief YouTube video preview of the final Action for Google Assistant, we will explore in this post, running on an Apple iPhone 8.

If you want to compare the development of an Action for Google Assistant with that of an Amazon Alexa Skill, using similar serverless technologies, then also read my previous post, Building Asynchronous, Serverless Alexa Skills with AWS Lambda, DynamoDB, S3, and Node.js.

Google Technologies

The final architecture of our Action for Google Assistant will look as follows.

Google Assistant Architecture v2

Here is a brief overview of the key technologies we will incorporate into our architecture.

Actions on Google

According to Google, Actions on Google is the platform for developers to extend the Google Assistant. Similar to Amazon’s Alexa Skills Kit Development Console for developing Alexa Skills, Actions on Google is a web-based platform that provides a streamlined user-experience to create, manage, and deploy Actions. We will use the Actions on Google platform to develop our Action in this post.

Dialogflow

According to Google, Dialogflow is an enterprise-grade Natural language understanding (NLU) platform that makes it easy for developers to design and integrate conversational user interfaces into mobile apps, web applications, devices, and bots. Dialogflow is powered by Google’s machine learning for Natural Language Processing (NLP). Dialogflow was initially known as API.AI prior being renamed by Google in late 2017.

We will use the Dialogflow web-based development platform and version 2 of the Dialogflow API, which became GA in April 2018, to build our Action for Google Assistant’s rich, natural-language conversational interface.

Google Cloud Functions

Google Cloud Functions are the event-driven serverless compute platform, part of the Google Cloud Platform (GCP). Google Cloud Functions are comparable to Amazon’s AWS Lambda and Azure Functions. Cloud Functions is a relatively new service from Google, released in beta in March 2017, and only recently becoming GA at Cloud Next ’18 (July 2018). The main features of Cloud Functions include automatic scaling, high availability, fault tolerance, no servers to provision, manage, patch or update, and a payment model based on the function’s execution time. The programmatic logic behind our Action for Google Assistant will be handled by a Cloud Function.

Node.js LTS

We will write our Action’s Google Cloud Function using the Node.js 8 runtime. Google just released the ability to write Google Cloud Functions in Node 8.11.1 and Python 3.7.0, at Cloud Next ’18 (July 2018). It is still considered beta functionality. Previously, you had to write your functions in Node version 6 (currently, 6.14.0).

Node 8, also known as Project Carbon, was the first Long Term Support (LTS) version of Node to support async/await with Promises. Async/await is the new way of handling asynchronous operations in Node.js. We will make use of async/await and Promises within our Action’s Cloud Function.

Google Cloud Datastore

Google Cloud Datastore is a highly-scalable NoSQL database. Cloud Datastore is similar in features and capabilities to Azure Cosmos DB and Amazon DynamoDB. Datastore automatically handles sharding and replication and offers features like a RESTful interface, ACID transactions, SQL-like queries, and indexes. We will use Datastore to persist the information returned to the user from our Action for Google Assistant.

Google Cloud Storage

The last technology, Google Cloud Storage is secure and durable object storage, nearly identical to Amazon Simple Storage Service (Amazon S3) and Azure Blob Storage. We will store publicly accessible images in a Google Cloud Storage bucket, which will be displayed in Google Assistant Basic Card responses.

Demonstration

To demonstrate Actions for Google Assistant, we will build an educational Action that responds to the user with interesting facts about Azure¹, Microsoft’s Cloud computing platform (Google talking about Azure, ironic). This is not intended to be an official Microsoft Action; it is only used for this demonstration and has not been published.

Source Code

All open-sourced code for this post can be found on GitHub. Note code samples in this post are displayed as Gists, which may not display correctly on some mobile and social media browsers. Links to gists are also provided.

Development Process

This post will focus on the development and integration of an Action with Google Cloud Platform’s serverless and asynchronous Cloud Functions, Cloud Datastore, and Cloud Storage. The post is not intended to be a general how-to on developing and publishing Actions for Google Assistant, or how to specifically use services on the Google Cloud Platform.

Building the Action will involve the following steps.

  • Design the Action’s conversation model;
  • Import the Azure Facts Entities into Cloud Datastore on GCP;
  • Create and upload the images to Cloud Storage on GCP;
  • Create the new Actions project using the Actions on Google console;
  • Develop the Action’s Intent using the Dialogflow console;
  • Bulk import the Action’s Entities using the Dialogflow console;
  • Configure the Dialogflow Actions on Google Integration;
  • Develop the Cloud Function an IDE and deploy it to GCP;
  • Test the Action using Actions on Google Simulator;

Let’s explore each step in more detail.

Conversational Model

The conversational model design of the Azure Tech Facts Action for Google Assistant is similar to the Azure Tech Facts Alexa Custom Skill, detailed in my previous post. We will have the option to invoke the Action in two ways, without initial intent (Explicit Invocation) and with intent (Implicit Invocation), as shown below. On the left, we see an example of an explicit invocation of the Action. Google Assistant then queries the user for more information. On the right, an implicit invocation of the Action includes the intent, being the Azure fact they want to learn about. Google Assistant responds directly, both vocally and visually with the fact.

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Each fact returned by Google Assistant will include a Simple ResponseBasic Card and Suggestions response types for devices with a display, as shown below. The user may continue to ask for additional facts or choose to cancel the Action at any time.

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Lastly, as part of the conversational model, we will include the option of asking for a random fact, as well as asking for help. Examples of both are shown below. Again, Google Assistant responds to the user, vocally and, optionally, visually, for display-enabled devices.

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GCP Account and Project

The following steps assume you have an existing GCP account and you have created a project on GCP to house the Cloud Function, Cloud Storage Bucket, and Cloud Datastore Entities. The post also assumes that you have the Google Cloud SDK installed on your development machine, and have authenticated your identity from the command line (gist).

Google Cloud Storage

First, the images, actually Azure icons available from Microsoft, displayed in the responses shown above, are uploaded to a Google Storage Bucket. To handle these tasks, we will use the gsutil CLI to create, upload, and manage the images. The gsutil CLI tool, like gcloud, is part of the Google Cloud SDK. The gsutil mb (make bucket) command creates the bucket, gsutil cp (copy files and objects) command is used to copy the images to the new bucket, and finally, the gsutil iam (get, set, or change bucket and/or object IAM permissions) command is used to make the images public. I have included a shell scriptbucket-uploader.sh, to make this process easier. (gist).

From the Storage Console on GCP, you should observe the images all have publicly accessible URLs. This will allow the Cloud Function to access the bucket, and retrieve and display the images. There are more secure ways to store and display the images from the function. However, this is the simplest method since we are not concerned about making the images public.

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We will need the URL of the new Storage bucket, later, when we develop to our Action’s Cloud Function. The bucket URL can be obtained from the Storage Console on GCP, as shown below in the Link URL.

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Google Cloud Datastore

In Cloud Datastore, the category data object is referred to as a Kind, similar to a Table in a relational database. In Datastore, we will have an ‘AzureFact’ Kind of data. In Datastore, a single object is referred to as an Entity, similar to a Row in a relational database. Each one of our entities represents a unique reference value from our Azure Facts Intent’s facts entities, such as ‘competition’ and ‘certifications’. Individual data is known as a Property in Datastore, similar to a Column in a relational database. We will have four Properties for each entity: name, response, title, and image. Lastly, a Key in Datastore is similar to a Primary Key in a relational database. The Key we will use for our entities is the unique reference value string from our Azure Facts Intent’s facts entities, such as ‘competition’ or ‘certifications’. The Key value is stored within the entity’s name Property.

There are a number of ways to create the Datastore entities for our Action, including manually from the Datastore console on GCP. However, to automate the process, we will use a script, written in Node.js and using the Google Cloud Datastore Node.js Client, to create the entities. We will use the Client API’s Datastore Class upsert method, which will create or update an entire collection of entities with one call and returns a callback. The script , upsert-entities.js, is included in source control and can be run with the following command. Below is a snippet of the script, which shows the structure of the entities (gist).

Once the upsert command completes successfully, you should observe a collection of ‘AzureFact’ Type Datastore Entities in the Datastore console on GCP.

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Below, we see the structure of a single Datastore Entity, the ‘certifications’ Entity, containing the fact response, title, and name of the image, which is stored in our Google Storage bucket.

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New Actions on Google Project

With the images uploaded and the database entries created, we can start building our Action. Using the Actions on Google web console, we first create a new Actions project.

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The Directory Information tab is where we define all the metadata about the Action. This information determines how the Action will look in the Actions directory and is required to publish your Action. The directory is where users discover published Actions on the web and mobile devices.

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Actions and Intents

The first part of developing a Google Action is building your Actions, more commonly called Intents. I personally find the overloading of the word ‘Actions’ in the Actions on Google console to be rather confusing.

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When developing the Actions, I suggest switching from the Actions on Google console to the Dialogflow console. Actions on Google provides a link to switch to Dialogflow. The first thing you will notice when switching to Dialogflow is what was called Actions in the Actions on Google console are now referred to as Intents in Dialogflow. The word Intent, used by Dialogflow, is standard terminology across other voice-assistant platforms, such as Alexa. To be clear, we are building an Action, which contains Intents — the Azure Facts Intent, Welcome Intent, and the Fallback Intent.

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Below, we see the Azure Facts Intent. The Azure Facts Intent is the main Intent, responsible for handling our user’s requests for facts about Azure. The Intent includes a fair number, but certainly not an exhaustive list, of training phrases. These represent all the possible ways a user might express intent when invoking the Action. According to Google, the greater the number of natural language examples in the Training Phrases section of Intents, the better the classification accuracy.

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Intent Entities

Each of the highlighted words in the training phrases maps to the facts parameter, which maps to a collection of @facts Entities. Entities represent a list of intents the Action is trained to understand.  According to Google, there are three types of entities: system (defined by Dialogflow), developer (defined by a developer), and user (built for each individual end-user in every request) entities. We will be creating developer type entities for our Action’s Intent.

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Synonyms

An entity contains Synonyms. Multiple synonyms may be mapped to a single reference value. The reference value is the value passed to the Cloud Function by the Action. For example, take the reference value of ‘competition’. A user might ask Google about Azure’s competition. However, the user might also substitute the words ‘competitor’ or ‘competitors’ for ‘competition’. Using synonyms, if the user utters any of these three words in their intent, they will receive the same response.

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Although our Azure Facts Action is a simple example, typical Actions might contain hundreds of entities or more, each with several synonyms. Dialogflow provides the option of copy and pasting bulk entities, in either JSON or CSV format. The project’s source code includes both JSON or CSV formats, which may be input in this manner.

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Automated Expansion

Not every possible fact, which will have a response, returned by Google Assistant, needs an entity defined. For example, we created a ‘compliance’ Cloud Datastore Entity. The Action understands the term ‘compliance’ and will return a response to the user if they ask about Azure compliance. However, ‘compliance’ is not defined as an Intent Entity, since we have chosen not to define any synonyms for the term ‘compliance’.

In order to allow this, you must enable Allow Automated Expansion. According to Google, this option allows an Agent to recognize values that have not been explicitly listed in the entity. Google describes Agents as NLU (Natural Language Understanding) modules.

Actions on Google Integration

Another configuration item in Dialogflow that needs to be completed is the Dialogflow’s Actions on Google integration. This will integrate the Azure Tech Facts Action with Google Assistant. Google provides more than a dozen different integrations, as shown below.

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The Dialogflow’s Actions on Google integration configuration is simple, just choose the Azure Facts Intent as our Action’s Implicit Invocation intent, in addition to the default Welcome Intent, which is our Action’s Explicit Invocation intent. According to Google, integration allows our Action to reach users on every device where the Google Assistant is available.

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Action Fulfillment

When an intent is received from the user, it is fulfilled by the Action. In the Dialogflow Fulfillment console, we see the Action has two fulfillment options, a Webhook or a Cloud Function, which can be edited inline. A Webhook allows us to pass information from a matched intent into a web service and get a result back from the service. In our example, our Action’s Webhook will call our Cloud Function, using the Cloud Function’s URL endpoint. We first need to create our function in order to get the endpoint, which we will do next.

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Google Cloud Functions

Our Cloud Function, called by our Action, is written in Node.js 8. As stated earlier, Node 8 LTS was the first LTS version to support async/await with Promises. Async/await is the new way of handling asynchronous operations in Node.js, replacing callbacks.

Our function, index.js, is divided into four sections: constants, intent handlers, helper functions, and the function’s entry point. The Cloud Function attempts to follow many of the coding practices from Google’s code examples on Github.

Constants

The section defines the global constants used within the function. Note the constant for the URL of our new Cloud Storage bucket, on line 30 below, IMAGE_BUCKET, references an environment variable, process.env.IMAGE_BUCKET. This value is set in the .env.yaml file. All environment variables in the .env.yaml file will be set during the Cloud Function’s deployment, explained later in this post. Environment variables were recently released, and are still considered beta functionality (gist).

The npm package dependencies declared in the constants section, are defined in the dependencies section of the package.json file. Function dependencies include Actions on Google, Firebase Functions, and Cloud Datastore (gist).

Intent Handlers

The three intent handlers correspond to the three intents in the Dialogflow console: Azure Facts Intent, Welcome Intent, and Fallback Intent. Each handler responds in a very similar fashion. The handlers all return a SimpleResponse for audio-only and display-enabled devices. Optionally, a BasicCard is returned for display-enabled devices (gist).

The Welcome Intent handler handles explicit invocations of our Action. The Fallback Intent handler handles both help requests, as well as cases when Dialogflow cannot match any of the user’s input. Lastly, the Azure Facts Intent handler handles implicit invocations of our Action, returning a fact to the user from Cloud Datastore, based on the user’s requested fact.

Helper Functions

The next section of the function contains two helper functions. The primary function is the buildFactResponse function. This is the function that queries Google Cloud Datastore for the fact. The second function, the selectRandomFact, handles the fact value of ‘random’, by selecting a random fact value to query Datastore. (gist).

Async/Await, Promises, and Callbacks

Let’s look closer at the relationship and asynchronous nature of the Azure Facts Intent intent handler and buildFactResponse function. Below, note the async function on line 1 in the intent and the await function on line 3, which is part of the buildFactResponse function call. This is typically how we see async/await applied when calling an asynchronous function, such as buildFactResponse. The await function allows the intent’s execution to wait for the buildFactResponse function’s Promise to be resolved, before attempting to use the resolved value to construct the response.

The buildFactResponse function returns a Promise, as seen on line 28. The Promise’s payload contains the results of the successful callback from the Datastore API’s runQuery function. The runQuery function returns a callback, which is then resolved and returned by the Promise, as seen on line 40 (gist).

The payload returned by Google Datastore, through the resolved Promise to the intent handler,  will resemble the example response, shown below. Note the image, response, and title key/value pairs in the textPayload section of the response payload. These are what are used to format the SimpleResponse and BasicCard responses (gist).

Cloud Function Deployment

To deploy the Cloud Function to GCP, use the gcloud CLI with the beta version of the functions deploy command. According to Google, gcloud is a part of the Google Cloud SDK. You must download and install the SDK on your system and initialize it before you can use gcloud. You should ensure that your function is deployed to the same region as your Google Storage Bucket. Currently, Cloud Functions are only available in four regions. I have included a shell scriptdeploy-cloud-function.sh, to make this step easier. (gist).

The creation or update of the Cloud Function can take up to two minutes. Note the .gcloudignore file referenced in the verbose output below. This file is created the first time you deploy a new function. Using the the .gcloudignore file, you can limit the deployed files to just the function (index.js) and the package.json file. There is no need to deploy any other files to GCP.

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If you recall, the URL endpoint of the Cloud Function is required in the Dialogflow Fulfillment tab. The URL can be retrieved from the deployment output (shown above), or from the Cloud Functions Console on GCP (shown below). The Cloud Function is now deployed and will be called by the Action when a user invokes the Action.

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Simulation Testing and Debugging

With our Action and all its dependencies deployed and configured, we can test the Action using the Simulation console on Actions on Google. According to Google, the Action Simulation console allows us to manually test our Action by simulating a variety of Google-enabled hardware devices and their settings. You can also access debug information such as the request and response that your fulfillment receives and sends.

Below, in the Action Simulation console, we see the successful display of the initial Azure Tech Facts containing the expected Simple Response, Basic Card, and Suggestions, triggered by a user’s explicit invocation of the Action.

The simulated response indicates that the Google Cloud Function was called, and it responded successfully. It also indicates that the Google Cloud Function was able to successfully retrieve the correct image from Google Cloud Storage.

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Below, we see the successful response to the user’s implicit invocation of the Action, in which they are seeking a fact about Azure’s Cognitive Services. The simulated response indicates that the Google Cloud Function was called, and it responded successfully. It also indicates that the Google Cloud Function was able to successfully retrieve the correct Entity from Google Cloud Datastore, as well as the correct image from Google Cloud Storage.

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If we had issues with the testing, the Action Simulation console also contains tabs containing the request and response objects sent to and from the Cloud Function, the audio response, a debug console, and any errors.

Logging and Analytics

In addition to the Simulation console’s ability to debug issues with our service, we also have Google Stackdriver Logging. The Stackdriver logs, which are viewed from the GCP management console, contain the complete requests and responses, to and from the Cloud Function, from the Google Assistant Action. The Stackdriver logs will also contain any logs entries you have explicitly placed in the Cloud Function.

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We also have the ability to view basic Analytics about our Action from within the Dialogflow Analytics console. Analytics displays metrics, such as the number of sessions, the number of queries, the number of times each Intent was triggered, how often users exited the Action from an intent, and Sessions flows, shown below.

In simple Action such as this one, the Session flow is not very beneficial. However, in more complex Actions, with multiple Intents and a variety potential user interactions, being able to visualize Session flows becomes essential to understanding the user’s conversational path through the Action.

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Conclusion

In this post, we have seen how to use the Actions on Google development platform and the latest version of the Dialogflow API to build Google Actions. Google Actions rather effortlessly integrate with the breath Google Cloud Platform’s many serverless offerings, including Google Cloud Functions, Cloud Datastore, and Cloud Storage.

We have seen how Google is quickly maturing their serverless functions, to compete with AWS and Azure, with the recently announced support of LTS version 8 of Node.js and Python, to create an Actions for Google Assistant.

Impact of Serverless

As an Engineer, I have spent endless days, late nights, and thankless weekends, building, deploying and managing servers, virtual machines, container clusters, persistent storage, and database servers. I think what is most compelling about platforms like Actions on Google, but even more so, serverless technologies on GCP, is that I spend the majority of my time architecting and developing compelling software. I don’t spend time managing infrastructure, worrying about capacity, configuring networking and security, and doing DevOps.

¹Azure is a trademark of Microsoft

All opinions expressed in this post are my own and not necessarily the views of my current or past employers, their clients, or Google and Microsoft.

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Building Asynchronous, Serverless Alexa Skills with AWS Lambda, DynamoDB, S3, and Node.js

Introduction

In the following post, we will use the new version 2 of the Alexa Skills Kit, AWS Lambda, Amazon DynamoDB, Amazon S3, and the latest LTS version Node.js, to create an Alexa Custom Skill. According to Amazon, a custom skill allows you to define the requests the skill can handle (intents) and the words users say to invoke those requests (utterances).

Alexa Skill Final Architecture v2.png

Alexa Skills Kit

According to Amazon, the Alexa Skills Kit (ASK) is a collection of self-service APIs, tools, documentation, and code samples that makes it possible to add skills to Alexa. The Alexa Skills Kit supports building different types of skills. Currently, Alexa skill types include Custom, Smart Home, Video, Flash Briefing, and List Skills. Each skill type makes use of a different Alexa Skill API.

AWS Serverless Platform

To create a custom skill for Alexa, you currently have the choice of using an AWS Lambda function or a web service. The AWS Lambda is part of an ecosystem of Cloud services and Developer tools, Amazon refers to as the AWS Serverless Platform. The platform’s services are designed to support the development and hosting of highly-performant, enterprise-grade serverless applications.

In this post, we will leverage three of the AWS Serverless Platform’s services, including Amazon DynamoDB, Amazon Simple Storage Service (Amazon S3), and AWS Lambda.

Node.js

AWS Lamba supports multiple programming languages, including Node.js (JavaScript), Python, Java (Java 8 compatible), and C# (.NET Core) and Go. All are excellent choices for writing modern serverless functions. For this post, we will use Node.js. According to Node.js Foundation, Node.js is an asynchronous event-driven JavaScript runtime built on Chrome’s V8 JavaScript engine.

In April 2018, AWS Lamba announced support for the Node.js 8.10 runtime, which is the current Long Term Support (LTS) version of Node.js. Node 8, also known as Project Carbon, was the first LTS version of Node to support async/await with Promises. Async/await is the new way of handling asynchronous operations in Node.js. We will make use of async/await and Promises with the custom skill.

Demonstration

To demonstrate Alexa Custom Skills we will build an informational skill that responds to the user with interesting facts about Azure¹, Microsoft’s Cloud computing platform (Alexa talking about Azure, ironic, I know). This is not an official Microsoft skill; it is only used for this demonstration and has not been published.

Source Code

All open-source code for this post can be found on GitHub. Code samples in this post are displayed as Gists, which may not display correctly on some mobile and social media browsers. Links to gists are also provided.

Important, this post and the associated source code were updated from v1.0 to v2.0 on 13 August 2018. You should clone the GitHub project again, to correspond with this revised post, if you originally cloned the project before 14 August 2018. Code changes were significant.

Objectives

This objective of the fact-based skill will be to demonstrate the following.

  • Build, deploy, and test an Alexa Custom Skill using AWS Lambda and Node.js;
  • Use DynamoDB to store and retrieve Alexa voice responses;
  • Maintain a count of user’s questions in DynamoDB using atomic counters;
  • Use Amazon S3 to store and retrieve images, used in Display Cards;
  • Log Alexa Skill activities using Amazon CloudWatch Logs;

Steps to Build

Building the Azure fact skill will involve the following steps.

  • Design the Alexa skill’s voice interaction model;
  • Design the skill’s Display Cards for Alexa-enabled products, to enhance the voice experience;
  • Create the skill’s DynamoDB table and import the responses the skill will return;
  • Create an S3 bucket and upload the images used for the Display Cards;
  • Write the Alexa Skill, which involves mapping the user’s spoken input to the intents your cloud-based service can handle;
  • Write the Lambda function, which involves responding to the user’s utterances, by building and returning appropriate voice and display card responses, from DynamoDB and S3;
  • Extend the default ASK-generated AWS IAM Role, to allow the Lambda to update DynamoDB;
  • Deploy the skill;
  • Test the skill;

Let’s explore each step in detail.

Voice Interaction Model

First, we must design the fact skill’s voice interaction model. We need to consider the way we want the user to interact with the skill. What is the user’s conversational journey? How do they invoke your skill? How will the user provide intent?

This skill will require two intent slot values, the fact the user is interested in (i.e. ‘global infrastructure’) and the user’s first name (i.e. ‘Susan’). We will train the skill to allow Alexa to query the user for each slot value, but also allow the user to provide either or both values in the initial intent invocation. We will also allow the user to request a random fact.

Shown below in the Alexa Skills Kit Development Console Test tab are three examples of interactions the skill is trained to understand and handle:

  1. The first example on the left invokes the skill with no intent (‘Alexa, load Azure Tech Facts). The user is led through a series of three questions to obtain the full intent.
  2. The center example is similar, however, the initial invocation contains a partial intent (‘Alexa, ask Azure Tech Facts for a fact about certifications’). Alexa must still ask for the user’s name.
  3. Lastly, the example on the right is a so-called ‘one-shot’ invocation (‘Alexa, ask Azure Tech Facts about Azure’s platforms for Gary’). The user’s invocation of the skill contains a complete intent, allowing Alexa to respond immediately with a fact about Azure platforms.

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In all cases, our skill has the ability to continue to provide the user with additional facts if they chose, or they may cancel at any time.

We also need to design how Alexa will respond. What is the persona will Alexa assume through her words, phrases, and use of Speech Synthesis Markup Language (SSML).

User Interaction Previews

Here are a few examples of interactions with the final Alexa skill using an iPhone 8 and the Alexa App. They are intended to show the rich conversational capabilities of custom skills more so the than the display, which is pretty poor on the Alexa App as compared to the Echo Show or even Echo Spot.

Example 1: Indirect Invocation

The first example shows a basic interaction with our Alexa skill. It demonstrates an indirect invocation, a user utterance without initial intent. It also illustrates several variations of user utterances (YouTube).

Example 2: Direct Invocation

The second example of an interaction our skill demonstrates a direct invocation, in which the initial user utterance contains intent. It also demonstrates the user following up with additional requests (YouTube).

Example 3: Direct Invocation, Help, Problem

Lastly, another direct invocation demonstrates the use of the Help Intent. You also see an example of when Alexa does not understand the user’s utterance.  The user is able to repeat their request, more clearly (YouTube).

Visual Interaction Model

Many Alexa-enabled devices are capable of both vocal and visual responses. Designing for a multimodal user experience is important. The instructional skill will provide vocal responses, as well as Display Cards optimized for the Amazon Echo Show. The skill contains a basic design for the Display Card shown during the initial invocation, where there is no intent uttered by the user.

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The fact skill also contains a Display Card, designed to present the final Alexa response to the user’s intent. The content of the vocal and visual response is returned from DynamoDB via the Lambda function. The random Azure icons, available from Microsoft, are hosted in an S3 bucket. Each fact response is unique, as well as the icon associated with the fact.

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The Display Cards will also work on other Alexa-enabled screen-based products. Shown below is the same card on an iPhone 8 using the Amazon Alexa app. This is the same app shown in the videos, above.

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DynamoDB

Next, we create the DynamoDB table used to store the facts the Alexa skill will respond with when invoked by the user. DynamoDB is Amazon’s non-relational database that delivers reliable performance at any scale. DynamoDB consists of three basic components: tables, items, and attributes.

There are numerous ways to create a DynamoDB table. For simplicity, I created the AzureFacts DynamoDB table using the AWS CLI (gist). You could also choose CloudFormation, or create the table using any of nine or more programming languages with an AWS SDK.

The AzureFacts table’s schema has four key/value pair attributes per item: Fact, Response, Image, and Hits. The Fact attribute, a string, contains the name of the fact the user is seeking. The Fact attribute also serves as the table’s unique partition key. The Response attribute, a string, contains the conversational response Alexa will return. The Image attribute, a string, contains the name of the image in the S3 bucket displayed by Alexa. Lastly, the Hits attribute, a number, stores the number of user requests for a particular fact.

Importing Table Items

After the DynamoDB table is created, the pre-defined facts are imported into the empty table using AWS CLI (gist). The JSON-formatted data file, AzureFacts.json, is included with the source code on GitHub.

The resulting table should appear as follows in the AWS Management Console.

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Note the imported items shown below. The Hits counts reflect the number of times each fact has been requested.

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Shown below is a detailed view of a single item that was imported into the DynamoDB table.

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Amazon S3 Image Bucket

Next, we create the Amazon S3 bucket, which will house the images, actually Azure icons as PNGs, returned by Alexa with each fact. Again, I used the AWS CLI for simplicity (gist).

The images can be uploaded manually to the bucket through a web browser, or programmatically, using the AWS CLI or SDKs. You will need to ensure the images are made public so they can be displayed by Alexa.

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Alexa Skill

Next, we create the actual Alexa custom skill. I have used version 2 of the Alexa Skills Kit (ASK) Software Development Kit (SDK) for Node.js and the new ASK Command Line Interface (ASK CLI) to create the skill. The ASK SDK v2 for Node.js was recently released in April 2018. If you have previously written Alexa skills using version 1 of the Node.js SDK, the creation of a new project and the format of the Lambda Node.js code is somewhat different. I strongly suggest reviewing the example skills provided by Amazon on GitHub.

With version 1, I would have likely used the Alexa Skills Kit Development Console to develop and deploy the skill, and separate IDE, like JetBrains WebStorm, to write the Lambda. The JSON-format skill would live in the Alexa Skills Kit Development Console, and my Lambda in source control. I would have used AWS Serverless Application Model (AWS SAM) or Claudia.js to handle the deployment of Lambda functions.

With version 2 of ASK, you can easily create and manage the Alexa skill’s JSON-formatted code, as well as the Lambda, all from the command-line and a single IDE or text editor. All components that comprise the skill can be kept together in source control. I now only use the Alexa Skills Kit Development Console to preview my deployed skill and for testing. I am not going to go into detail about creating a new project using the ASK CLI, I suggest reviewing Amazon’s instructional guides.

Below, I have initiated a new AWS profile for the Alexa skill using the ask init command.

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There are three main parts to the new skill project created by the ASK CLI: the skill’s manifest (skill.json), model(s) (en-US.json), and API endpoint, the Lambda (index.js). The skill’s manifest, skill.json, contains information (metadata) about the skill. This is the same information you find in the Distribution tab of the Alexa Skills Kit Development Console. The manifest includes publishing information, example phrases to invoke the skill, the skill’s category, distribution locales, privacy information, and the location of the skill’s API endpoint, the Lambda. An end-user would most commonly see this information in Amazon Alexa app when adding skills to their Alexa-enabled devices.

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Next, the skill’s model, en-US.json, is located the models sub-directory. This file defines the skill’s custom interaction model, it contains the skill’s interaction model written in JSON, which includes the invocation name, intents, standard and custom slots, sample utterances, slot values, and synonyms of those values. This is the same information you would find in the Build tab of the Alexa Skills Kit Development Console. Amazon has an excellent guide to creating your custom skill’s interaction model.

Intents and Intent Slots

The skill’s custom interaction model contains the AzureFactsIntent intent, along with the boilerplate Cancel, Help and Stop intents. The AzureFactsIntent intent contains two intent slots, myName and myQuestion. The myName intent slot is a standard AMAZON.US_FIRST_NAME slot type. According to Amazon, this slot type understands thousands of popular first names commonly used by speakers in the United States. Shown below, I have included a short list of sample utterances in the intent model, which helps improve voice recognition for Alexa (gist).

Custom Slot Types and Entities

The myQuestion intent slot is a custom slot type. According to Amazon, a custom slot type defines a list of representative values for the slot. The myQuestion slot contains all the available facts the custom instructional skill understands and can retrieve from DynamoDB. Like myName, the user can provide the fact intent in various ways (gist).

This slot also contains synonyms for each fact. Collectively, the slot value, it’s synonyms, and the optional ID are collectively referred to as an Entity. According to Amazon, entity resolution improves the way Alexa matches possible slot values in a user’s utterance with the slots defined in the skill’s interaction model.

An example of an entity in the myQuestion custom slot type is ‘competition’. A user can ask Alexa to tell them about Azure’s competition. The slot value ‘competition’ returns a fact about Azure’s leading competitors, as reported on the G2 Crowd website’s Microsoft Azure Alternatives & Competitors page. However, the user might also substitute the words ‘competitor’ or ‘competitors’ for ‘competition’. Using synonyms, if the user utters any of these three words in their intent, they will receive the same response from Alexa (gist).

Lambda

Initializing a skill with the ASK CLI also creates the default API endpoint, a Lambda (index.js). The serverless Lambda function is written in Node.js 8.10. As mentioned in the Introduction, AWS recently announced support for the Node.js 8.10 runtime, in April. This is the first LTS version of Node to support async/await with Promises. Node’s async/await is the new way of handling asynchronous operations in Node.js.

The layout of the custom skill’s Lambda’s code closely follows the custom Alexa Fact Skill example. I suggest closely reviewing this example. The Lambda has four main sections: constants, setup code, intent handlers, and helper functions.

In addition to the boilerplate Help, Stop, Error, and Session intent handlers, there are the LaunchRequestHandler and the AzureFactsIntent handlers. According to Amazon, a LaunchRequestHandler fires when the Lambda receives a LaunchRequest from Alexa, in which the user invokes the skill with the invocation name, but does not provide any command mapping to an intent.

The AzureFactsIntent aligns with the custom intent we defined in the skill’s model (en-US.json), of the same name. This handler handles an IntentRequest from Alexa. This handler and the buildFactResponse function the handler calls are what translate a request for a fact from the user into a request to DynamoDB for a response.

The AzureFactsIntent handler checks the IntentRequest for both the myName and myQuestion slot values. If the values are unfulfilled, the AzureFactsIntent handler delegates responsibility back to Alexa, using a Dialog delegate directive (addDelegateDirective). Alexa then requests the slot values from the user in a conversational interaction. Alexa then calls the AzureFactsIntent handler again (gist).

Once both slot values are received by the AzureFactsIntent handler, it calls the buildFactResponse function, passing in the myName and myQuestion slot values. In turn, the buildFactResponse function calls AWS.DynamoDB.DocumentClient.update. The DynamoDB update returns a callback. In turn, the buildFactResponse function returns a Promise, a standard built-in object type, part of the JavaScript ES2015 spec (gist).

What is unique about the DynamoDB update call in this case, is it actually performs two functions. First, it implements an Atomic Counter. According to AWS, an atomic counter is a numeric DynamoDB attribute that is incremented, unconditionally, without interfering with other write requests. The update increments the numeric Hits attribute of the requested fact by exactly one. Secondly, the update returns the DynamoDB item. We can increment the count and get the response in a single call.

The buildFactResponse function’s Promise returns the DynamoDB item, a JSON object, from the callback. An example of a JSON response payload is shown below. (gist).

The AzureFactsIntent handler uses the async/await methods to perform the call to the buildFactResponse function. Note line 7 of the AzureFactsIntent handler below, where the async method is applied directly to the handler. Note line 33 where the await method is used with the call to the buildFactResponse function (gist).

The AzureFactsIntent handler awaits the Promise from the buildFactResponse function. In an async function, you can await for any Promise or catch its rejection cause. If the update callback and the ensuing Promise were both returned successfully, the AzureFactsIntent handler returns both a vocal and visual response to Alexa.

AWS IAM Role

By default, an AWS IAM Role was created by ASK when the project was initialized, the ask-lambda-alexa-skill-azure-facts role. This role is automatically associated with the AWS Managed Policy, AWSLambdaBasicExecutionRole. This managed policy simply allows the skill’s Lambda function to create Amazon CloudWatch Events (gist).

For the skill’s Lambda to read and write to DynamoDB, we must extend the default role’s permissions, by adding an additional policy. I have created a new AzureFacts_Alexa_Skill IAM Policy, which allows the associated role to get and update items from the AzureFacts DynamoDB table, and that is it. The role only has access to two of forty possible DynamoDB actions, and only for the AzureFacts table, and nothing else. Following the principle of Least Privilege is a cornerstone of AWS Security (gist).

Below, we see the new IAM Policy in the AWS Management Console.

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Below, we see the policy being applied to the skill’s IAM Role, along with the original AWS managed policy.

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Deploying the Skill

Version 2 of the ASK CLI makes deploying the Alexa custom skill very easy. Using the ASK CLI’s deploy command, we can validate and deploy the skill (manifest),  model, and Lambda, all at once, as shown below. This makes DevOps automation of skill deployments with tools like Jenkins or AWS CodeDeploy straight-forward.

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You can verify the skill has been deployed, from the Alexa Skills Kit Development Console. You should observe the skill’s model (intents, slots, entities, and endpoints) in the Build tab. You should observe the skill’s publishing details in the Distribution tab. Note deploying the skill does not submit the skill to Amazon’s for review and publishing, you must still submit the skill separately.

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From the AWS Lambda Management Console, you should observe the skill’s Lambda was deployed. You should observe only the skill can trigger the Lambda. Lastly, you should observe that the correct IAM Role was applied to the Lambda, giving the Lambda access to Amazon CloudWatch Logs and Amazon DynamoDB.

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Testing the Skill

The ASK CLI comes with the simulate command. According to Amazon, the simulate command simulates an invocation of the skill with text-based input. Again, the ASK CLI makes DevOps test automation with tools like Jenkins or AWS CodeDeploy pretty easy (gist).

Below, are the results of simulating the invocation. The simulate command returns the expected verbal response, including any SSML, and the visual responses (the Display Card). You could easily write an automation script to run a battery of these tests on every code commit, and prior to deployment.

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I also like to manually test my skills from the Alexa Skills Kit Development Console Test tab. You may invoke the skill using your voice or by typing the skill invocation.

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The Alexa Skills Kit Development Console Test tab both shows and speaks Alexa’s response. The console also displays the request and response body (JSON input/output), as well as the Display Card for an Echo Show and Echo Spot.

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Lastly, the Alexa Skills Kit Development Console Test tab displays the Device Log. The log captures Alexa Directives and Events. I have found the Device Log to be very helpful in troubleshooting problems with deployed skills.

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CloudWatch Logs

By default the custom skill outputs events to CloudWatch Logs. I have added the DynamoDB callback payload, as well as the slot values of myName and myQuestion to the logs, for each successful Alexa response. CloudWatch logs, like the Device Logs above, are very helpful in troubleshooting problems with deployed skills.

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Conclusion

In this brief post, we have seen how to use the new ASK SDK/CLI version 2, services from the AWS Serverless Platform, and the LTS version of Node.js, to create an Alexa Custom Skill. Using the AWS Serverless Platform, we could easily extend the example to take advantage of additional serverless services, such as the use of Amazon SNS and SQS for notifications and messaging and Amazon Kinesis for analytics.

In a future post, we will extend this example, adding the capability to securely add and update our DynamoDB table’s items. We will use addition AWS services, including Amazon Cognito to authorize access to our API. We will also use AWS API Gateway to integrate with our Lambdas, producing a completely serverless API.

¹Azure is a trademark of Microsoft

All opinions expressed in this post are my own and not necessarily the views of my current or past employers or their clients.

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Deploying Spring Boot Apps to AWS with Netflix Nebula and Spinnaker: Part 2 of 2

Part One of this post examined enterprise deployment tools and introduced two of Netflix’s open-source deployment tools, the Nebula Gradle plugins, and Spinnaker. In Part Two, we will deploy a production-ready Spring Boot application, the Election microservice, to multiple Amazon EC2 instances, behind an Elastic Load Balancer (ELB). We will use a fully automated DevOps workflow. The build, test, package, bake, deploy process will be handled by the Netflix Nebula Gradle Linux Packaging Plugin, Jenkins, and Spinnaker. The high-level process will involve the following steps:

  • Configure Gradle to build a production-ready fully executable application for Unix systems (executable JAR)
  • Using deb-s3 and GPG Suite, create a secure, signed APT (Debian) repository on Amazon S3
  • Using Jenkins and the Netflix Nebula plugin, build a Debian package, containing the executable JAR and configuration files
  • Using Jenkins and deb-s3, publish the package to the S3-based APT repository
  • Using Spinnaker (HashiCorp Packer under the covers), bake an Ubuntu Amazon Machine Image (AMI), replete with the executable JAR installed from the Debian package
  • Deploy an auto-scaling set of Amazon EC2 instances from the baked AMI, behind an ELB, running the Spring Boot application using both the Red/Black and Highlander deployment strategies
  • Be able to repeat the entire automated build, test, package, bake, deploy process, triggered by a new code push to GitHub

The overall build, test, package, bake, deploy process will look as follows.

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DevOps Architecture

Spinnaker’s modern architecture is comprised of several independent microservices. The codebase is written in Java and Groovy, and leverages the Spring Boot framework¹. Spinnaker’s configuration, startup, updates, and rollbacks are centrally managed by Halyard. Halyard provides a single point of contact for command line interaction with Spinnaker’s microservices.

Spinnaker can be installed on most private or public infrastructure, either containerized or virtualized. Spinnaker has links to a number of Quickstart installations on their website. For this demonstration, I deployed and configured Spinnaker on Azure, starting with one of the Azure Spinnaker quick-start ARM templates. The template provisions all the necessary Azure resources. For better performance, I chose upgraded the default VM to a larger Standard D4 v3, which contains 4 vCPUs and 16 GB of memory. I would recommend at least 2 vCPUs and 8 GB of memory at a minimum for Spinnaker.

Another Azure VM, in the same virtual network as the Spinnaker VM, already hosts Jenkins, SonarQube, and Nexus Repository OSS.

From Spinnaker on Azure, Debian Packages are uploaded to the APT package repository on AWS S3. Spinnaker also bakes Amazon Machine Images (AMI) on AWS. Spinnaker provisions the AWS resources, including EC2 instances, Load Balancers, Auto Scaling Groups, Launch Configurations, and Security Groups. The only resources you need on AWS to get started with Spinnaker are a VPC and Subnets. There are some minor, yet critical prerequisites for naming your VPC and Subnets.

Other external tools include GitHub for source control and Slack for notifications. I have built and managed everything from a Mac, however, all tools are platform agnostic. The Spring Boot application was developed in JetBrains IntelliJ.

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Source Code

All source code for this post can be found on GitHub. The project’s README file contains a list of the Election service’s endpoints.

Code samples in this post are displayed as Gists, which may not display correctly on some mobile and social media browsers. Links to gists are also provided.

APT Repository

After setting up Spinnaker on Azure, I created an APT repository on Amazon S3, using the instructions provided by Netflix, in their Code Lab, An Introduction to Spinnaker: Hello Deployment. The setup involves creating an Amazon S3 bucket to serve as an APT (Debian) repository, creating a GPG key for signing, and using deb-s3 to manage the repository. The Code Lab also uses Aptly, a great tool, which I skipped for brevity.

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GPG Key

On the Mac, I used GPG Suite to create a GPG (GNU Privacy Guard or GnuPG) automatic signing key for my APT repository. The key is required by Spinnaker to verify the Debian packages in the repository, before installation.

The Ruby Gem, deb-s3, makes management of the Debian packages easy and automatable with Jenkins. Jenkins uploads the Debian packages, using a deb-s3 command, such as the following (gist). In this post, Jenkins calls the command from the shell script, upload-deb-package.sh, which is included in the GitHub project.

The Jenkins user requires access to the signing key, to build and upload the Debian packages. I created my GPG key on my Mac, securely copied the key to my Ubuntu-based Jenkins VM, and then imported the key for the Jenkins user. You could also create your key on Ubuntu, directly. Make sure you backup your private key in a secure location!

Nebula Packaging Plugin

Next, I set up a Gradle task in my build.gradle file to build my Debian packages using the Netflix Nebula Gradle Linux Packaging Plugin. Although Debian packaging tasks could become complex for larger application installations, this task for this post is pretty simple. I used many of the best-practices suggested by Spring for Production-grade deployments. The best-practices guide recommends file location, file modes, and file user and group ownership. I create the JAR as a fully executable JAR, meaning it is started like any other executable and does not have to be started with the standard java -jar command.

In the task, shown below (gist), the JAR and the external configuration file (optional) are copied to specific locations during the deployment and symlinked, as required. I used the older SysVInit system (init.d) to enable the application to automatically starts on boot. You should probably use systemctl for your services with Ubuntu 16.04.

You can use the ar (archive) command (i.e., ar -x spring-postgresql-demo_4.5.0_all.deb), to extract and inspect the structure of a Debian package. The data.tar.gz file, displayed below in Atom, shows the final package structure.

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Base AMI

Next, I baked a base AMI for Spinnaker to use. This base AMI is used by Spinnaker to bake (re-bake) the final AMI(s) used for provisioning the EC2 instances, containing the Spring Boot Application. The Spinnaker base AMI is built from another base AMI, the official Ubuntu 16.04 LTS image. I installed the OpenJDK 8 package on the AMI, which is required to run the Java-based Election service. Lastly and critically, I added information about the location of my S3-based APT Debian package repository to the list of configured APT data sources, and the GPG key required for package verification. This information and key will be used later by Spinnaker to bake AMIʼs, using this base AMI. The set-up script, base_ubuntu_ami_setup.sh, which is included in the GitHub project.

Jenkins

This post uses a single Jenkins CI/CD pipeline. Using a Webhook, the pipeline is automatically triggered by every git push to the GitHub project. The pipeline pulls the source code, builds the application, and performs unit-tests and static code analysis with SonarQube. If the build succeeds and the tests pass, the build artifact (JAR file) is bundled into a Debian package using the Nebula Packaging plugin, uploaded to the S3 APT repository using s3-deb, and archived locally for Spinnaker to reference. Once the pipeline is completed, on success or on failure, a Slack notification is sent. The Jenkinsfile, used for this post is available in the project on Github.

Below is a traditional Jenkins view of the CI/CD pipeline, with links to unit test reports, SonarQube results, build artifacts, and GitHub source code.

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Below is the same pipeline viewed using the Jenkins Blue Ocean plugin.

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It is important to perform sufficient testing before building the Debian package. You donʼt want to bake an AMI and deploy EC2 instances, at a cost, before finding out the application has bugs.

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Spinnaker Setup

First, I set up a new Spinnaker Slack channel and a custom bot user. Spinnaker details the Slack set up in their Notifications and Events Guide. You can configure what type of Spinnaker events trigger Slack notifications.

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AWS Spinnaker User

Next, I added the required Spinnaker User, Policy, and Roles to AWS. Spinnaker uses this access to query and provision infrastructure on your behalf. The Spinnaker User requires Power User level access to perform all their necessary tasks. AWS IAM set up is detailed by Spinnaker in their Cloud Providers Setup for AWS. They also describe the setup of other cloud providers. You need to be reasonably familiar with AWS IAM, including the PassRole permission to set up this part. As part of the setup, you enable AWS for Spinnaker and add your AWS account using the Halyard interface.

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Spinnaker Security Groups

Next, I set up two Spinnaker Security Groups, corresponding to two AWS Security Groups, one for the load balancer and one for the Election service. The load balancer security group exposes port 80, and the Election service security group exposes port 8080.

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Spinnaker Load Balancer

Next, I created a Spinnaker Load Balancer, corresponding to an Amazon Classic Load Balancer. The Load Balancer will load-balance the Election service EC2 instances. Below you see a Load Balancer, balancing a pair of active EC2 instances, the result of a Red/Black deployment.

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Spinnaker can currently create both AWS Classic Load Balancers as well as Application Load Balancers (ALB).

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Spinnaker Pipeline

This post uses a single, basic Spinnaker Pipeline. The pipeline bakes a new AMI from the Debian package generated by the Jenkins pipeline. After a manual approval stage, Spinnaker deploys a set of EC2 instances, behind the Load Balancer, which contains the latest version of the Election service. Spinnaker finishes the pipeline by sending a Slack notification.

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Jenkins Integration

The pipeline is triggered by the successful completion of the Jenkins pipeline. This is set in the Configuration stage of the pipeline. The integration with Jenkins is managed through Spinnaker’s Igor service.

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Bake Stage

Next, in the Bake stage, Spinnaker bakes a new AMI, containing the Debian package generated by the Jenkins pipeline. The stageʼs configuration contains the package name to reference.

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The stageʼs configuration also includes a reference to which Base AMI to use, to bake the new AMIs. Here I have used the AMI ID of the base Spinnaker AMI, I created previously.

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Deploy Stage

Next, the Deploy stage deploys the Election service, running on EC2 instances, provisioned from the new AMI, which was baked in the last stage. To configure the Deploy stage, you define a Spinnaker Server Group. According to Spinnaker, the Server Group identifies the deployable artifact, VM image type, the number of instances, autoscaling policies, metadata, Load Balancer, and a Security Group.

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The Server Group also defines the Deployment Strategy. Below, I chose the Red/Black Deployment Strategy (also referred to as Blue/Green). This strategy will disable, not terminate the active Server Group. If the new deployment fails, we can manually or automatically perform a Rollback to the previous, currently disabled Server Group.

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Letʼs Start Baking!

With set up complete, letʼs kick off a git push, trigger and complete the Jenkins pipeline, and finally trigger the Spinnaker pipeline. Below we see the pipelineʼs Bake stage has been started. Spinnakerʼs UI lets us view the Bakery Details. The Bakery, provided by Spinnakerʼs Rosco service, bakes the AMIs. Rosco uses HashiCorp Packer to bake the AMIs, using standard Packer templates.

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Below we see Spinnaker (Rosco/Packer) locating the Base Spinnaker AMI we configured in the Pipelineʼs Bake stage. Next, we see Spinnaker sshʼing into a new EC2 instance with a temporary keypair and Security Group and starting the Election service Debian package installation.

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Continuing, we see the latest Debian package, derived from the Jenkins pipelineʼs archive, being pulled from the S3-based APT repo. The package is verified using the GPG key and then installed. Lastly, we see a new AMI is created, containing the deployed Election service, which was initially built and packaged by Jenkins. Note the AWS Resource Tags created by Spinnaker, as shown in the Bakery output.

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The base Spinnaker AMI and the AMIs baked by Spinnaker are visible in the AWS Console. Note the naming conventions used by Spinnaker for the AMIs, the Source AMI used to build the new APIs, and the addition of the Tags, which we saw being applied in the Bakery output above. The use of Tags indirectly allows full traceability from the deployed EC2 instance all the way back to the original code commit to git by the Developer.

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Red/Black Deployments

With the new AMI baked successfully, and a required manual approval, using a Manual Judgement type pipeline stage, we can now begin a Red/Black deployment to AWS.

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Using the Server Group configuration in the Deploy stage, Spinnaker deploys two EC2 instances, behind the ELB.

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Below, we see the successful results of the Red/Black deployment. The single Spinnaker Cluster contains two deployed Server Groups. One group, the previously active Server Group (RED), comprised of two EC2 instances, is disabled. The ‘RED’ EC2 instances are unregistered with the load balancer but still running. The new Server Group (BLACK), also comprised of two EC2 instances, is now active and registered with the Load Balancer. Spinnaker will spread EC2 instances evenly across all Availability Zones in the US East (N. Virginia) Region.

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From the AWS Console, we can observe four running instances, though only two are registered with the load-balancer.

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Here we see each deployed Server Group has a different Auto Scaling Group and Launch Configuration. Note the continued use of naming conventions by Spinnaker.

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 There can be only one, Highlander!

Now, in the Deploy stage of the pipeline, we will switch the Server Groupʼs Strategy to Highlander. The Highlander strategy will, as you probably guessed by the name, destroy all other Server Groups in the Cluster. This is more typically used for lower environments, like Development or Test, where you are only interested in the next version of the application for testing. The Red/Black strategy is more applicable to Production, where you want the opportunity to quickly rollback to the previous deployment, if necessary.

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Following a successful deployment, below, we now see the first two Server Groups have been terminated, and a third Server Group in the Cluster is active.

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In the AWS Console, we can confirm the four previous EC2 instances have been successfully terminated as a result of the Highlander deployment strategy, and two new instances are running.

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As well, the previous Auto Scaling Groups and Launch Configurations have been deleted from AWS by Spinnaker.

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As expected, the Classic Load Balancer only contains the two most recent EC2 instances from the last Server Group deployed.

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Confirming the Deployment

Using the DNS address of the load balancer, we can hit the Election service endpoints, on either of the EC2 instances. All API endpoints are listed in the Projectʼs README file. Below, from a web browser, we see the candidates resource returning candidate information, retrieved from the Electionʼs PostgreSQL RDS database Test instance.

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Similarly, from Postman, we can hit the load balancer and get back election information from the elections resource, using an HTTP GET.

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I intentionally left out a discussion of the service’s RDS database and how configuration management was handled with Spring Profiles and Spring Cloud Config. Both topics were out of scope for this post.

Conclusion

Although this was a brief, whirlwind overview of deployment tools, it shows the power of delivery tools like Spinnaker, when seamlessly combined with other tools, like Jenkins and the Nebula plugins. Together, these tools are capable of efficiently, repeatably, and securely deploying large numbers of containerized and non-containerized applications to a variety of private, public, and hybrid cloud infrastructure.

All opinions expressed in this post are my own and not necessarily the views of my current or past employers or their clients.

¹ Running Spinnaker on Compute Engine

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Deploying Spring Boot Apps to AWS with Netflix Nebula and Spinnaker: Part 1 of 2

Listening to DevOps industry pundits, you might be convinced everyone is running containers in Production (or by now, serverless). Although containerization is growing at a phenomenal rate, several recent surveys¹ indicate less than 50% of enterprises are deploying containers in Production. Filter those results further with the fact, of those enterprises, only a small percentage of their total application portfolios are containerized, let alone in Production.

As a DevOps Consultant, I regularly work with corporations whose global portfolios are in the thousands of applications. Indeed, some percentage of their applications are containerized, with less running in Production. However, a majority of those applications, even those built on modern, light-weight, distributed architectures, are still being deployed to bare-metal and virtualized public cloud and private data center infrastructure, for a variety of reasons.

Enterprise Deployment

Due to the scale and complexity of application portfolios, many organizations have invested in enterprise deployment tools, either commercially available or developed in-house. The enterprise deployment tool’s primary objective is to standardize the process of securely, reliably, and repeatably packaging, publishing, and deploying both containerized and non-containerized applications to large fleets of virtual machines and bare-metal servers, across multiple, geographically dispersed data centers and cloud providers. Enterprise deployment tools are particularly common in tightly regulated and compliance-driven organizations, as well as organizations that have undertaken large amounts of M&A, resulting in vastly different application technology stacks.

Enterprise CI/CD/Release Workflow

Better-known examples of commercially available enterprise deployment tools include IBM UrbanCode Deploy (aka uDeploy), XebiaLabs XL Deploy, CA Automic Release Automation, Octopus Deploy, and Electric Cloud ElectricFlow. While commercial tools continue to gain market share³, many organizations are tightly coupled to their in-house solutions through years of use and fear of widespread process disruption, given current economic, security, compliance, and skills-gap sensitivities.

Deployment Tool Anatomy

Most Enterprise deployment tools are compatible with standard binary package types, including Debian (.deb) and Red Hat  (RPM) Package Manager (.rpm) packages for Linux, NuGet (.nupkg) packages for Windows, and Node Package Manager (.npm) and Bower for JavaScript. There are equivalent package types for other popular languages and formats, such as Go, Python, Ruby, SQL, Android, Objective-C, Swift, and Docker. Packages usually contain application metadata, a signature to ensure the integrity and/or authenticity², and a compressed payload.

Enterprise deployment tools are normally integrated with open-source packaging and publishing tools, such as Apache Maven, Apache Ivy/Ant, Gradle, NPMNuGet, BundlerPIP, and Docker.

Binary packages (and images), built with enterprise deployment tools, are typically stored in private, open-source or commercial binary (artifact) repositories, such as SpacewalkJFrog Artifactory, and Sonatype Nexus Repository. The latter two, Artifactory and Nexus, support a multitude of modern package types and repository structures, including Maven, NuGet, PyPI, NPM, Bower, Ruby Gems, CocoaPods, Puppet, Chef, and Docker.

Mature binary repositories provide many features in addition to package management, including role-based access control, vulnerability scanning, rich APIs, DevOps integration, and fault-tolerant, high-availability architectures.

Lastly, enterprise deployment tools generally rely on standard package management systems to retrieve and install cryptographically verifiable packages and images. These include YUM (Yellowdog Updater, Modified), APT (aptitude), APK (Alpine Linux), NuGet, Chocolatey, NPM, PIP, Bundler, and Docker. Packages are deployed directly to running infrastructure, or indirectly to intermediate deployable components as Amazon Machine Images (AMI), Google Compute Engine machine images, VMware machines, Docker Images, or CoreOS rkt.

Open-Source Alternative

One such enterprise with an extensive portfolio of both containerized and non-containerized applications is Netflix. To standardize their deployments to multiple types of cloud infrastructure, Netflix has developed several well-known open-source software (OSS) tools, including the Nebula Gradle plugins and Spinnaker. I discussed Spinnaker in my previous post, Managing Applications Across Multiple Kubernetes Environments with Istio, as an alternative to Jenkins for deploying container workloads to Kubernetes on Google (GKE).

As a leader in OSS, Netflix has documented their deployment process in several articles and presentations, including a post from 2016, ‘How We Build Code at Netflix.’ According to the article, the high-level process for deployment to Amazon EC2 instances involves the following steps:

  • Code is built and tested locally using Nebula
  • Changes are committed to a central git repository
  • Jenkins job executes Nebula, which builds, tests, and packages the application for deployment
  • Builds are “baked” into Amazon Machine Images (using Spinnaker)
  • Spinnaker pipelines are used to deploy and promote the code change

The Nebula plugins and Spinnaker leverage many underlying, open-source technologies, including Pivotal Spring, Java, Groovy, Gradle, Maven, Apache Commons, Redline RPM, HashiCorp Packer, Redis, HashiCorp Consul, Cassandra, and Apache Thrift.

Both the Nebula plugins and Spinnaker have been battle tested in Production by Netflix, as well as by many other industry leaders after Netflix open-sourced the tools in 2014 (Nebula) and 2015 (Spinnaker). Currently, there are approximately 20 Nebula Gradle plugins available on GitHub. Notable core-contributors in the development of Spinnaker include Google, Microsoft, Pivotal, Target, Veritas, and Oracle, to name a few. A sign of its success, Spinnaker currently has over 4,600 Stars on GitHub!

Part Two: Demonstration

In Part Two, we will deploy a production-ready Spring Boot application, the Election microservice, to multiple Amazon EC2 instances, behind an Elastic Load Balancer (ELB). We will use a fully automated DevOps workflow. The build, test, package, bake, deploy process will be handled by the Netflix Nebula Gradle Linux Packaging Plugin, Jenkins, and Spinnaker. The high-level process will involve the following steps:

  • Configure Gradle to build a production-ready fully executable application for Unix systems (executable JAR)
  • Using deb-s3 and GPG Suite, create a secure, signed APT (Debian) repository on Amazon S3
  • Using Jenkins and the Netflix Nebula plugin, build a Debian package, containing the executable JAR and configuration files
  • Using Jenkins and deb-s3, publish the package to the S3-based APT repository
  • Using Spinnaker (HashiCorp Packer under the covers), bake an Ubuntu Amazon Machine Image (AMI), replete with the executable JAR installed from the Debian package
  • Deploy an auto-scaling set of Amazon EC2 instances from the baked AMI, behind an ELB, running the Spring Boot application using both the Red/Black and Highlander deployment strategies
  • Be able to repeat the entire automated build, test, package, bake, deploy process, triggered by a new code push to GitHub

The overall build, test, package, bake, deploy process will look as follows.

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References

 

All opinions expressed in this post are my own and not necessarily the views of my current or past employers or their clients.

¹ Recent Surveys: ForresterPortworx,  Cloud Foundry Survey
² Courtesy Wikipedia – rpm
³ XebiaLabs Kicks Off 2017 with Triple-Digit Growth in Enterprise DevOps

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Managing Applications Across Multiple Kubernetes Environments with Istio: Part 2

In this two-part post, we are exploring the creation of a GKE cluster, replete with the latest version of Istio, often referred to as IoK (Istio on Kubernetes). We will then deploy, perform integration testing, and promote an application across multiple environments within the cluster.

Part Two

In Part One of this post, we created a Kubernetes cluster on the Google Cloud Platform, installed Istio, provisioned a PostgreSQL database, and configured DNS for routing. Under the assumption that v1 of the Election microservice had already been released to Production, we deployed v1 to each of the three namespaces.

In Part Two of this post, we will learn how to utilize the advanced API testing capabilities of Postman and Newman to ensure v2 is ready for UAT and release to Production. We will deploy and perform integration testing of a new v2 of the Election microservice, locally on Kubernetes Minikube. Once confident v2 is functioning as intended, we will promote and test v2 across the dev, test, and uat namespaces.

Source Code

As a reminder, all source code for this post can be found on GitHub. The project’s README file contains a list of the Election microservice’s endpoints. To get started quickly, use one of the two following options (gist).

Code samples in this post are displayed as Gists, which may not display correctly on some mobile and social media browsers. Links to gists are also provided.

This project includes a kubernetes sub-directory, containing all the Kubernetes resource files and scripts necessary to recreate the example shown in the post.

Testing Locally with Minikube

Deploying to GKE, no matter how automated, takes time and resources, whether those resources are team members or just compute and system resources. Before deploying v2 of the Election service to the non-prod GKE cluster, we should ensure that it has been thoroughly tested locally. Local testing should include the following test criteria:

  1. Source code builds successfully
  2. All unit-tests pass
  3. A new Docker Image can be created from the build artifact
  4. The Service can be deployed to Kubernetes (Minikube)
  5. The deployed instance can connect to the database and execute the Liquibase changesets
  6. The deployed instance passes a minimal set of integration tests

Minikube gives us the ability to quickly iterate and test an application, as well as the Kubernetes and Istio resources required for its operation, before promoting to GKE. These resources include Kubernetes Namespaces, Secrets, Deployments, Services, Route Rules, and Istio Ingresses. Since Minikube is just that, a miniature version of our GKE cluster, we should be able to have a nearly one-to-one parity between the Kubernetes resources we apply locally and those applied to GKE. This post assumes you have the latest version of Minikube installed, and are familiar with its operation.

This project includes a minikube sub-directory, containing all the Kubernetes resource files and scripts necessary to recreate the Minikube deployment example shown in this post. The three included scripts are designed to be easily adapted to a CI/CD DevOps workflow. You may need to modify the scripts to match your environment’s configuration. Note this Minikube-deployed version of the Election service relies on the external Amazon RDS database instance.

Local Database Version

To eliminate the AWS costs, I have included a second, alternate version of the Minikube Kubernetes resource files, minikube_db_local This version deploys a single containerized PostgreSQL database instance to Minikube, as opposed to relying on the external Amazon RDS instance. Be aware, the database does not have persistent storage or an Istio sidecar proxy.

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Minikube Cluster

If you do not have a running Minikube cluster, create one with the minikube start command.

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Minikube allows you to use normal kubectl CLI commands to interact with the Minikube cluster. Using the kubectl get nodes command, we should see a single Minikube node running the latest Kubernetes v1.10.0.

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Istio on Minikube

Next, install Istio following Istio’s online installation instructions. A basic Istio installation on Minikube, without the additional add-ons, should only require a single Istio install script.

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If successful, you should observe a new istio-system namespace, containing the four main Istio components: istio-ca, istio-ingress, istio-mixer, and istio-pilot.

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Deploy v2 to Minikube

Next, create a Minikube Development environment, consisting of a dev Namespace, Istio Ingress, and Secret, using the part1-create-environment.sh script. Next, deploy v2 of the Election service to thedev Namespace, along with an associated Route Rule, using the part2-deploy-v2.sh script. One v2 instance should be sufficient to satisfy the testing requirements.

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Access to v2 of the Election service on Minikube is a bit different than with GKE. When routing external HTTP requests, there is no load balancer, no external public IP address, and no public DNS or subdomains. To access the single instance of v2 running on Minikube, we use the local IP address of the Minikube cluster, obtained with the minikube ip command. The access port required is the Node Port (nodePort) of the istio-ingress Service. The command is shown below (gist) and included in the part3-smoke-test.sh script.

The second part of our HTTP request routing is the same as with GKE, relying on an Istio Route Rules. The /v2/ sub-collection resource in the HTTP request URL is rewritten and routed to the v2 election Pod by the Route Rule. To confirm v2 of the Election service is running and addressable, curl the /v2/actuator/health endpoint. Spring Actuator’s /health endpoint is frequently used at the end of a CI/CD server’s deployment pipeline to confirm success. The Spring Boot application can take a few minutes to fully start up and be responsive to requests, depending on the speed of your local machine.

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Using the Kubernetes Dashboard, we should see our deployment of the single Election service Pod is running successfully in Minikube’s dev namespace.

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Once deployed, we run a battery of integration tests to confirm that the new v2 functionality is working as intended before deploying to GKE. In the next section of this post, we will explore the process creating and managing Postman Collections and Postman Environments, and how to automate those Collections of tests with Newman and Jenkins.

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Integration Testing

The typical reason an application is deployed to lower environments, prior to Production, is to perform application testing. Although definitions vary across organizations, testing commonly includes some or all of the following types: Integration Testing, Functional Testing, System Testing, Stress or Load Testing, Performance Testing, Security Testing, Usability Testing, Acceptance Testing, Regression Testing, Alpha and Beta Testing, and End-to-End Testing. Test teams may also refer to other testing forms, such as Whitebox (Glassbox), Blackbox Testing, Smoke, Validation, or Sanity Testing, and Happy Path Testing.

The site, softwaretestinghelp.com, defines integration testing as, ‘testing of all integrated modules to verify the combined functionality after integration is termed so. Modules are typically code modules, individual applications, client and server applications on a network, etc. This type of testing is especially relevant to client/server and distributed systems.

In this post, we are concerned that our integrated modules are functioning cohesively, primarily the Election service, Amazon RDS database, DNS, Istio Ingress, Route Rules, and the Istio sidecar Proxy. Unlike Unit Testing and Static Code Analysis (SCA), which is done pre-deployment, integration testing requires an application to be deployed and running in an environment.

Postman

I have chosen Postman, along with Newman, to execute a Collection of integration tests before promoting to the next environment. The integration tests confirm the deployed application’s name and version. The integration tests then perform a series of HTTP GET, POST, PUT, PATCH, and DELETE actions against the service’s resources. The integration tests verify a successful HTTP response code is returned, based on the type of request made.

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Postman tests are written in JavaScript, similar to other popular, modern testing frameworks. Postman offers advanced features such as test-chaining. Tests can be chained together through the use of environment variables to store response values and pass them onto to other tests. Values shared between tests are also stored in the Postman Environments. Below, we store the ID of the new candidate, the result of an HTTP POST to the /candidates endpoint. We then use the stored candidate ID in proceeding HTTP GET, PUT, and PATCH test requests to the same /candidates endpoint.

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Environment-specific variables, such as the resource host, port, and environment sub-collection resource, are abstracted and stored as key/value pairs within Postman Environments, and called through variables in the request URL and within the tests. Thus, the same Postman Collection of tests may be run against multiple environments using different Postman Environments.

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Postman Runner allows us to run multiple iterations of our Collection. We also have the option to build in delays between tests. Lastly, Postman Runner can load external JSON and CSV formatted test data, which is beyond the scope of this post.

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Postman contains a simple Run Summary UI for viewing test results.

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Test Automation

To support running tests from the command line, Postman provides Newman. According to Postman, Newman is a command-line collection runner for Postman. Newman offers the same functionality as Postman’s Collection Runner, all part of the newman CLI. Newman is Node.js module, installed globally as an npm package, npm install newman --global.

Typically, Development and Testing teams compose Postman Collections and define Postman Environments, locally. Teams run their tests locally in Postman, during their development cycle. Then, those same Postman Collections are executed from the command line, or more commonly as part of a CI/CD pipeline, such as with Jenkins.

Below, the same Collection of integration tests ran in the Postman Runner UI, are run from the command line, using Newman.

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Jenkins

Without a doubt, Jenkins is the leading open-source CI/CD automation server. The building, testing, publishing, and deployment of microservices to Kubernetes is relatively easy with Jenkins. Generally, you would build, unit-test, push a new Docker image, and then deploy your application to Kubernetes using a series of CI/CD pipelines. Below, we see examples of these pipelines using Jenkins Blue Ocean, starting with a continuous integration pipeline, which includes unit-testing and Static Code Analysis (SCA) with SonarQube.

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Followed by a pipeline to build the Docker Image, using the build artifact from the above pipeline, and pushes the Image to Docker Hub.

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The third pipeline that demonstrates building the three Kubernetes environments and deploying v1 of the Election service to the dev namespace. This pipeline is just for demonstration purposes; typically, you would separate these functions.

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Spinnaker

An alternative to Jenkins for the deployment of microservices is Spinnaker, created by Netflix. According to Netflix, ‘Spinnaker is an open source, multi-cloud continuous delivery platform for releasing software changes with high velocity and confidence.’ Spinnaker is designed to integrate easily with Jenkins, dividing responsibilities for continuous integration and delivery, with deployment. Below, Spinnaker two sample deployment pipelines, similar to Jenkins, for deploying v1 and v2 of the Election service to the non-prod GKE cluster.

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Below, Spinnaker has deployed v2 of the Election service to dev using a Highlander deployment strategy. Subsequently, Spinnaker has deployed v2 to test using a Red/Black deployment strategy, leaving the previously released v1 Server Group in place, in case a rollback is required.

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Once Spinnaker is has completed the deployment tasks, the Postman Collections of smoke and integration tests are executed by Newman, as part of another Jenkins CI/CD pipeline.

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In this pipeline, a set of basic smoke tests is run first to ensure the new deployment is running properly, and then the integration tests are executed.

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In this simple example, we have a three-stage pipeline created from a Jenkinsfile (gist).

Test Results

Newman offers several options for displaying test results. For easy integration with Jenkins, Newman results can be delivered in a format that can be displayed as JUnit test reports. The JUnit test report format, XML, is a popular method of standardizing test results from different testing tools. Below is a truncated example of a test report file (gist).

Translating Newman test results to JUnit reports allows the percentage of test cases successfully executed, to be tracked over multiple deployments, a universal testing metric. Below we see the JUnit Test Reports Test Result Trend graph for a series of test runs.

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Deploying to Development

Development environments typically have a rapid turnover of application versions. Many teams use their Development environment as a continuous integration environment, where every commit that successfully builds and passes all unit tests, is deployed. The purpose of the CI deployments is to ensure build artifacts will successfully deploy through the CI/CD pipeline, start properly, and pass a basic set of smoke tests.

Other teams use the Development environments as an extension of their local Minikube environment. The Development environment will possess some or all of the required external integration points, which the Developer’s local Minikube environment may not. The goal of the Development environment is to help Developers ensure their application is functioning correctly and is ready for the Test teams to evaluate, prior to promotion to the Test environment.

Some external integration points, such as external payment gateways, customer relationship management (CRM) systems, content management systems (CMS), or data analytics engines, are often stubbed-out in lower environments. Generally, third-party providers only offer a limited number of parallel non-Production integration environments. While an application may pass through several non-prod environments, testing against all external integration points will only occur in one or two of those environments.

With v2 of the Election service ready for testing on GKE, we deploy it to the GKE cluster’s dev namespace using the part4a-deploy-v2-dev.sh script. We will also delete the previous v1 version of the Election service. Similar to the v1 deployment script, the v2 scripts perform a kube-inject command, which manually injects the Istio sidecar proxy alongside the Election service, into each election v2 Pod. The deployment script also deploys an alternate Istio Route Rule, which routes requests to api.dev.voter-demo.com/v2/* resource of v2 of the Election service.

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Once deployed, we run our Postman Collection of integration tests with Newman or as part of a CI/CD pipeline. In the Development environment, we may choose to run a limited set of tests for the sake of expediency, or because not all external integration points are accessible.

Promotion to Test

With local Minikube and Development environment testing complete, we promote and deploy v2 of the Election service to the Test environment, using the part4b-deploy-v2-test.sh script. In Test, we will not delete v1 of the Election service.

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Often, an organization will maintain a running copy of all versions of an application currently deployed to Production, in a lower environment. Let’s look at two scenarios where this is common. First, v1 of the Election service has an issue in Production, which needs to be confirmed and may require a hot-fix by the Development team. Validation of the v1 Production bug is often done in a lower environment. The second scenario for having both versions running in an environment is when v1 and v2 both need to co-exist in Production. Organizations frequently support multiple API versions. Cutting over an entire API user-base to a new API version is often completed over a series of releases, and requires careful coordination with API consumers.

Testing All Versions

An essential role of integration testing should be to confirm that both versions of the Election service are functioning correctly, while simultaneously running in the same namespace. For example, we want to verify traffic is routed correctly, based on the HTTP request URL, to the correct version. Another common test scenario is database schema changes. Suppose we make what we believe are backward-compatible database changes to v2 of the Election service. We should be able to prove, through testing, that both the old and new versions function correctly against the latest version of the database schema.

There are different automation strategies that could be employed to test multiple versions of an application without creating separate Collections and Environments. A simple solution would be to templatize the Environments file, and then programmatically change the Postman Environment’s version variable injected from a pipeline parameter (abridged environment file shown below).

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Once initial automated integration testing is complete, Test teams will typically execute additional forms of application testing if necessary, before signing off for UAT and Performance Testing to begin.

User-Acceptance Testing

With testing in the Test environments completed, we continue onto UAT. The term UAT suggest that a set of actual end-users (API consumers) of the Election service will perform their own testing. Frequently, UAT is only done for a short, fixed period of time, often with a specialized team of Testers. Issues experienced during UAT can be expensive and impact the ability to release an application to Production on-time if sign-off is delayed.

After deploying v2 of the Election service to UAT, and before opening it up to the UAT team, we would naturally want to repeat the same integration testing process we conducted in the previous Test environment. We must ensure that v2 is functioning as expected before our end-users begin their testing. This is where leveraging a tool like Jenkins makes automated integration testing more manageable and repeatable. One strategy would be to duplicate our existing Development and Test pipelines, and re-target the new pipeline to call v2 of the Election service in UAT.

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Again, in a JUnit report format, we can examine individual results through the Jenkins Console.

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We can also examine individual results from each test run using a specific build’s Console Output.

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Testing and Instrumentation

To fully evaluate the integration test results, you must look beyond just the percentage of test cases executed successfully. It makes little sense to release a new version of an application if it passes all functional tests, but significantly increases client response times, unnecessarily increases memory consumption or wastes other compute resources, or is grossly inefficient in the number of calls it makes to the database or third-party dependencies. Often times, integration testing uncovers potential performance bottlenecks that are incorporated into performance test plans.

Critical intelligence about the performance of the application can only be obtained through the use of logging and metrics collection and instrumentation. Istio provides this telemetry out-of-the-box with Zipkin, Jaeger, Service Graph, Fluentd, Prometheus, and Grafana. In the included Grafana Istio Dashboard below, we see the performance of v1 of the Election service, under test, in the Test environment. We can compare request and response payload size and timing, as well as request and response times to external integration points, such as our Amazon RDS database. We are able to observe the impact of individual test requests on the application and all its integration points.

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As part of integration testing, we should monitor the Amazon RDS CloudWatch metrics. CloudWatch allows us to evaluate critical database performance metrics, such as the number of concurrent database connections, CPU utilization, read and write IOPS, Memory consumption, and disk storage requirements.

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A discussion of metrics starts moving us toward load and performance testing against Production service-level agreements (SLAs). Using a similar approach to integration testing, with load and performance testing, we should be able to accurately estimate the sizing requirements our new application for Production. Load and Performance Testing helps answer questions like the type and size of compute resources are required for our GKE Production cluster and for our Amazon RDS database, or how many compute nodes and number of instances (Pods) are necessary to support the expected user-load.

All opinions expressed in this post are my own, and not necessarily the views of my current or past employers, or their clients.

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Managing Applications Across Multiple Kubernetes Environments with Istio: Part 1

In the following two-part post, we will explore the creation of a GKE cluster, replete with the latest version of Istio, often referred to as IoK (Istio on Kubernetes). We will then deploy, perform integration testing, and promote an application across multiple environments within the cluster.

Application Environment Management

Container orchestration engines, such as Kubernetes, have revolutionized the deployment and management of microservice-based architectures. Combined with a Service Mesh, such as Istio, Kubernetes provides a secure, instrumented, enterprise-grade platform for modern, distributed applications.

One of many challenges with any platform, even one built on Kubernetes, is managing multiple application environments. Whether applications run on bare-metal, virtual machines, or within containers, deploying to and managing multiple application environments increases operational complexity.

As Agile software development practices continue to increase within organizations, the need for multiple, ephemeral, on-demand environments also grows. Traditional environments that were once only composed of Development, Test, and Production, have expanded in enterprises to include a dozen or more environments, to support the many stages of the modern software development lifecycle. Current application environments often include Continous Integration and Delivery (CI), Sandbox, Development, Integration Testing (QA), User Acceptance Testing (UAT), Staging, Performance, Production, Disaster Recovery (DR), and Hotfix. Each environment requiring its own compute, security, networking, configuration, and corresponding dependencies, such as databases and message queues.

Environments and Kubernetes

There are various infrastructure architectural patterns employed by Operations and DevOps teams to provide Kubernetes-based application environments to Development teams. One pattern consists of separate physical Kubernetes clusters. Separate clusters provide a high level of isolation. Isolation offers many advantages, including increased performance and security, the ability to tune each cluster’s compute resources to meet differing SLAs, and ensuring a reduced blast radius when things go terribly wrong. Conversely, separate clusters often result in increased infrastructure costs and operational overhead, and complex deployment strategies. This pattern is often seen in heavily regulated, compliance-driven organizations, where security, auditability, and separation of duties are paramount.

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Namespaces

An alternative to separate physical Kubernetes clusters is virtual clusters. Virtual clusters are created using Kubernetes Namespaces. According to Kubernetes documentation, ‘Kubernetes supports multiple virtual clusters backed by the same physical cluster. These virtual clusters are called namespaces’.

In most enterprises, Operations and DevOps teams deliver a combination of both virtual and physical Kubernetes clusters. For example, lower environments, such as those used for Development, Test, and UAT, often reside on the same physical cluster, each in a separate virtual cluster (namespace). At the same time, environments such as Performance, Staging, Production, and DR, often require the level of isolation only achievable with physical Kubernetes clusters.

In the Cloud, physical clusters may be further isolated and secured using separate cloud accounts. For example, with AWS you might have a Non-Production AWS account and a Production AWS account, both managed by an AWS Organization.

Kube Clusters Diagram v2 F3

In a multi-environment scenario, a single physical cluster would contain multiple namespaces, into which separate versions of an application or applications are independently deployed, accessed, and tested. Below we see a simple example of a single Kubernetes non-prod cluster on the left, containing multiple versions of different microservices, deployed across three namespaces. You would likely see this type of deployment pattern as applications are deployed, tested, and promoted across lower environments, before being released to Production.

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Example Application

To demonstrate the promotion and testing of an application across multiple environments, we will use a simple election-themed microservice, developed for a previous post, Developing Cloud-Native Data-Centric Spring Boot Applications for Pivotal Cloud Foundry. The Spring Boot-based application allows API consumers to create, read, update, and delete, candidates, elections, and votes, through an exposed set of resources, accessed via RESTful endpoints.

Source Code

All source code for this post can be found on GitHub. The project’s README file contains a list of the Election microservice’s endpoints. To get started quickly, use one of the two following options (gist).

Code samples in this post are displayed as Gists, which may not display correctly on some mobile and social media browsers. Links to gists are also provided.

This project includes a kubernetes sub-directory, containing all the Kubernetes resource files and scripts necessary to recreate the example shown in the post. The scripts are designed to be easily adapted to a CI/CD DevOps workflow. You will need to modify the script’s variables to match your own environment’s configuration.

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Database

The post’s Spring Boot application relies on a PostgreSQL database. In the previous post, ElephantSQL was used to host the PostgreSQL instance. This time, I have used Amazon RDS for PostgreSQL. Amazon RDS for PostgreSQL and ElephantSQL are equivalent choices. For simplicity, you might also consider a containerized version of PostgreSQL, managed as part of your Kubernetes environment.

Ideally, each environment should have a separate database instance. Separate database instances provide better isolation, fine-grained RBAC, easier test data lifecycle management, and improved performance. Although, for this post, I suggest a single, shared, minimally-sized RDS instance.

The PostgreSQL database’s sensitive connection information, including database URL, username, and password, are stored as Kubernetes Secrets, one secret for each namespace, and accessed by the Kubernetes Deployment controllers.

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Istio

Although not required, Istio makes the task of managing multiple virtual and physical clusters significantly easier. Following Istio’s online installation instructions, download and install Istio 0.7.1.

To create a Google Kubernetes Engine (GKE) cluster with Istio, you could use gcloud CLI’s container clusters create command, followed by installing Istio manually using Istio’s supplied Kubernetes resource files. This was the method used in the previous post, Deploying and Configuring Istio on Google Kubernetes Engine (GKE).

Alternatively, you could use Istio’s Google Cloud Platform (GCP) Deployment Manager files, along with the gcloud CLI’s deployment-manager deployments create command to create a Kubernetes cluster, replete with Istio, in a single step. Although arguably simpler, the deployment-manager method does not provide the same level of fine-grain control over cluster configuration as the container clusters create method. For this post, the deployment-manager method will suffice.

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The latest version of the Google Kubernetes Engine, available at the time of this post, is 1.9.6-gke.0. However, to install this version of Kubernetes Engine using the Istio’s supplied deployment Manager Jinja template requires updating the hardcoded value in the istio-cluster.jinja file from 1.9.2-gke.1. This has been updated in the next release of Istio.

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Another change, the latest version of Istio offered as an option in the istio-cluster-jinja.schema file. Specifically, the installIstioRelease configuration variable is only 0.6.0. The template does not include 0.7.1 as an option. Modify the istio-cluster-jinja.schema file to include the choice of 0.7.1. Optionally, I also set 0.7.1 as the default. This change should also be included in the next version of Istio.

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There are a limited number of GKE and Istio configuration defaults defined in the istio-cluster.yaml file, all of which can be overridden from the command line.

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To optimize the cluster, and keep compute costs to a minimum, I have overridden several of the default configuration values using the properties flag with the gcloud CLI’s deployment-manager deployments create command. The README file provided by Istio explains how to use this feature. Configuration changes include the name of the cluster, the version of Istio (0.7.1), the number of nodes (2), the GCP zone (us-east1-b), and the node instance type (n1-standard-1). I also disabled automatic sidecar injection and chose not to install the Istio sample book application onto the cluster (gist).

Cluster Provisioning

To provision the GKE cluster and deploy Istio, first modify the variables in the part1-create-gke-cluster.sh file (shown above), then execute the script. The script also retrieves your cluster’s credentials, to enable command line interaction with the cluster using the kubectl CLI.

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Once complete, validate the version of Istio by examining Istio’s Docker image versions, using the following command (gist).

The result should be a list of Istio 0.7.1 Docker images.

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The new cluster should be running GKE version 1.9.6.gke.0. This can be confirmed using the following command (gist).

Or, from the GCP Cloud Console.

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The new GKE cluster should be composed of (2) n1-standard-1 nodes, running in the us-east-1b zone.

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As part of the deployment, all of the separate Istio components should be running within the istio-system namespace.

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As part of the deployment, an external IP address and a load balancer were provisioned by GCP and associated with the Istio Ingress. GCP’s Deployment Manager should have also created the necessary firewall rules for cluster ingress and egress.

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Building the Environments

Next, we will create three namespaces,dev, test, and uat, which represent three non-production environments. Each environment consists of a Kubernetes Namespace, Istio Ingress, and Secret. The three environments are deployed using the part2-create-environments.sh script.

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Deploying Election v1

For this demonstration, we will assume v1 of the Election service has been previously promoted, tested, and released to Production. Hence, we would expect v1 to be deployed to each of the lower environments. Additionally, a new v2 of the Election service has been developed and tested locally using Minikube. It is ready for deployment to the three environments and will undergo integration testing (detailed in Part Two of the post).

If you recall from our GKE/Istio configuration, we chose manual sidecar injection of the Istio proxy. Therefore, all election deployment scripts perform a kube-inject command. To connect to our external Amazon RDS database, this kube-inject command requires the includeIPRanges flag, which contains two cluster configuration values, the cluster’s IPv4 CIDR (clusterIpv4Cidr) and the service’s IPv4 CIDR (servicesIpv4Cidr).

Before deployment, we export the includeIPRanges value as an environment variable, which will be used by the deployment scripts, using the following command, export IP_RANGES=$(sh ./get-cluster-ip-ranges.sh). The get-cluster-ip-ranges.sh script is shown below (gist).

Using this method with manual sidecar injection is discussed in the previous post, Deploying and Configuring Istio on Google Kubernetes Engine (GKE).

To deploy v1 of the Election service to all three namespaces, execute the part3-deploy-v1-all-envs.sh script.

istio_051.png

We should now have two instances of v1 of the Election service, running in the dev, test, and uat namespaces, for a total of six election-v1 Kubernetes Pods.

istio_052

HTTP Request Routing

Before deploying additional versions of the Election service in Part Two of this post, we should understand how external HTTP requests will be routed to different versions of the Election service, in multiple namespaces. In the post’s simple example, we have a matrix of three namespaces and two versions of the Election service. That means we need a method to route external traffic to up to six different election versions. There multiple ways to solve this problem, each with their own pros and cons. For this post, I found a combination of DNS and HTTP request rewriting is most effective.

DNS

First, to route external HTTP requests to the correct namespace, we will use subdomains. Using my current DNS management solution, Azure DNS, I create three new A records for my registered domain, voter-demo.com. There is one A record for each namespace, including api.dev, api.test, and api.uat.

istio_077.png

All three subdomains should resolve to the single external IP address assigned to the cluster’s load balancer.

istio_010.png

As part of the environments creation, the script deployed an Istio Ingress, one to each environment. The ingress accepts traffic based on a match to the Request URL (gist).

The istio-ingress service load balancer, running in the istio-system namespace, routes inbound external traffic, based on the Request URL, to the Istio Ingress in the appropriate namespace.

istio_053.png

The Istio Ingress in the namespace then directs the traffic to one of the Kubernetes Pods, containing the Election service and the Istio sidecar proxy.

istio_068.png

HTTP Rewrite

To direct the HTTP request to v1 or v2 of the Election service, an Istio Route Rule is used. As part of the environment creation, along with a Namespace and Ingress resources, we also deployed an Istio Route Rule to each environment. This particular route rule examines the HTTP request URL for a /v1/ or /v2/ sub-collection resource. If it finds the sub-collection resource, it performs a HTTPRewrite, removing the sub-collection resource from the HTTP request. The Route Rule then directs the HTTP request to the appropriate version of the Election service, v1 or v2 (gist).

According to Istio, ‘if there are multiple registered instances with the specified tag(s), they will be routed to based on the load balancing policy (algorithm) configured for the service (round-robin by default).’ We are using the default load balancing algorithm to distribute requests across multiple copies of each Election service.

The final external HTTP request routing for the Election service in the Non-Production GKE cluster is shown on the left, in the diagram, below. Every Election service Pod also contains an Istio sidecar proxy instance.

Kube Clusters Diagram F14

Below are some examples of HTTP GET requests that would be successfully routed to our Election service, using the above-described routing strategy (gist).

Part Two

In Part One of this post, we created the Kubernetes cluster on the Google Cloud Platform, installed Istio, provisioned a PostgreSQL database, and configured DNS for routing. Under the assumption that v1 of the Election microservice had already been released to Production, we deployed v1 to each of the three namespaces.

In Part Two of this post, we will learn how to utilize the sophisticated API testing capabilities of Postman and Newman to ensure v2 is ready for UAT and release to Production. We will deploy and perform integration testing of a new, v2 of the Election microservice, locally, on Kubernetes Minikube. Once we are confident v2 is functioning as intended, we will promote and test v2, across the dev, test, and uat namespaces.

All opinions expressed in this post are my own, and not necessarily the views of my current or past employers, or their clients.

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Developing Cloud-Native Data-Centric Spring Boot Applications for Pivotal Cloud Foundry

In this post, we will explore the development of a cloud-native, data-centric Spring Boot 2.0 application, and its deployment to Pivotal Software’s hosted Pivotal Cloud Foundry service, Pivotal Web Services. We will add a few additional features, such as Spring Data, Lombok, and Swagger, to enhance our application.

According to Pivotal, Spring Boot makes it easy to create stand-alone, production-grade Spring-based Applications. Spring Boot takes an opinionated view of the Spring platform and third-party libraries. Spring Boot 2.0 just went GA on March 1, 2018. This is the first major revision of Spring Boot since 1.0 was released almost 4 years ago. It is also the first GA version of Spring Boot that provides support for Spring Framework 5.0.

Pivotal Web Services’ tagline is ‘The Agile Platform for the Agile Team Powered by Cloud Foundry’. According to Pivotal,  Pivotal Web Services (PWS) is a hosted environment of Pivotal Cloud Foundry (PCF). PWS is hosted on AWS in the US-East region. PWS utilizes two availability zones for redundancy. PWS provides developers a Spring-centric PaaS alternative to AWS Elastic Beanstalk, Elastic Container Service (Amazon ECS), and OpsWorks. With PWS, you get the reliability and security of AWS, combined with the rich-functionality and ease-of-use of PCF.

To demonstrate the feature-rich capabilities of the Spring ecosystem, the Spring Boot application shown in this post incorporates the following complimentary technologies:

  • Spring Boot Actuator: Sub-project of Spring Boot, adds several production grade services to Spring Boot applications with little developer effort
  • Spring Data JPA: Sub-project of Spring Data, easily implement JPA based repositories and data access layers
  • Spring Data REST: Sub-project of Spring Data, easily build hypermedia-driven REST web services on top of Spring Data repositories
  • Spring HATEOAS: Create REST representations that follow the HATEOAS principle from Spring-based applications
  • Springfox Swagger 2: We are using the Springfox implementation of the Swagger 2 specification, an automated JSON API documentation for API’s built with Spring
  • Lombok: The @Data annotation generates boilerplate code that is typically associated with simple POJOs (Plain Old Java Objects) and beans: @ToString, @EqualsAndHashCode, @Getter, @Setter, and @RequiredArgsConstructor

Source Code

All source code for this post can be found on GitHub. To get started quickly, use one of the two following commands (gist).

For this post, I have used JetBrains IntelliJ IDEA and Git Bash on Windows for development. However, all code should be compatible with most popular IDEs and development platforms. The project assumes you have Docker and the Cloud Foundry Command Line Interface (cf CLI) installed locally.

Code samples in this post are displayed as Gists, which may not display correctly on some mobile and social media browsers. Links to gists are also provided.

Demo Application

The Spring Boot application demonstrated in this post is a simple election-themed RESTful API. The app allows API consumers to create, read, update, and delete, candidates, elections, and votes, via its exposed RESTful HTTP-based resources.

The Spring Boot application consists of (7) JPA Entities that mirror the tables and views in the database, (7) corresponding Spring Data Repositories, (2) Spring REST Controller, (4) Liquibase change sets, and associated Spring, Liquibase, Swagger, and PCF configuration files. I have intentionally chosen to avoid the complexities of using Data Transfer Objects (DTOs) for brevity, albeit a security concern, and directly expose the entities as resources.

img022_Final_Project

Controller Resources

This application is a simple CRUD application. The application contains a few simple HTTP GET resources in each of the two controller classes, as an introduction to Spring REST controllers. For example, the CandidateController contains the /candidates/summary and /candidates/summary/{election} resources (shown below in Postman). Typically, you would expose your data to the end-user as controller resources, as opposed to exposing the entities directly. The ease of defining controller resources is one of the many powers of Spring Boot.

img025_CustomResource.PNG

Paging and Sorting

As an introduction to Spring Data’s paging and sorting features, both the VoteRepository and VotesElectionsViewRepository Repository Interfaces extend Spring Data’s PagingAndSortingRepository<T,ID> interface, instead of the default CrudRepository<T,ID> interface. With paging and sorting enabled, you may both sort and limit the amount of data returned in the response payload. For example, to reduce the size of your response payload, you might choose to page through the votes in blocks of 25 votes at a time. In that case, as shown below in Postman, if you needed to return just votes 26-50, you would append the /votes resource with ?page=1&size=25. Since paging starts at page 0 (zero), votes 26-50 will on page 1.

img024_Paging

Swagger

This project also includes the Springfox implementation of the Swagger 2 specification. Along with the Swagger 2 dependency, the project takes a dependency on io.springfox:springfox-swagger-ui. The Springfox Swagger UI dependency allows us to view and interactively test our controller resources through Swagger’s browser-based UI, as shown below.

img027B_Swagger

All Swagger configuration can be found in the project’s SwaggerConfig Spring Configuration class.

Gradle

This post’s Spring Boot application is built with Gradle, although it could easily be converted to Maven if desired. According to Gradle, Gradle is the modern tool used to build, automate and deliver everything from mobile apps to microservices.

Data

In real-life, most applications interact with one or more data sources. The Spring Boot application demonstrated in this post interacts with data from a PostgreSQL database. PostgreSQL, or simply Postgres, is the powerful, open-source object-relational database system, which has supported production-grade applications for 15 years. The application’s single elections database consists of (6) tables, (3) views, and (2) function, which are both used to generate random votes for this demonstration.

img020_Database_Diagram

Spring Data makes interacting with PostgreSQL easy. In addition to the features of Spring Data, we will use Liquibase. Liquibase is known as the source control for your database. With Liquibase, your database development lifecycle can mirror your Spring development lifecycle. Both DDL (Data Definition Language) and DML (Data Manipulation Language) changes are versioned controlled, alongside the Spring Boot application source code.

Locally, we will take advantage of Docker to host our development PostgreSQL database, using the official PostgreSQL Docker image. With Docker, there is no messy database installation and configuration of your local development environment. Recreating and deleting your PostgreSQL database is simple.

To support the data-tier in our hosted PWS environment, we will implement ElephantSQL, an offering from the Pivotal Services Marketplace. ElephantSQL is a hosted version of PostgreSQL, running on AWS. ElephantSQL is referred to as PostgreSQL as a Service, or more generally, a Database as a Service or DBaaS. As a Pivotal Marketplace service, we will get easy integration with our PWS-hosted Spring Boot application, with near-zero configuration.

Docker

First, set up your local PostgreSQL database using Docker and the official PostgreSQL Docker image. Since this is only a local database instance, we will not worry about securing our database credentials (gist).

Your running PostgreSQL container should resemble the output shown below.

img001_docker

Data Source

Most IDEs allow you to create and save data sources. Although this is not a requirement, it makes it easier to view the database’s resources and table data. Below, I have created a data source in IntelliJ from the running PostgreSQL container instance. The port, username, password, and database name were all taken from the above Docker command.

img002_IntelliJ_Data_Source

Liquibase

There are multiple strategies when it comes to managing changes to your database. With Liquibase, each set of changes are handled as change sets. Liquibase describes a change set as an atomic change that you want to apply to your database. Liquibase offers multiple formats for change set files, including XML, JSON, YAML, and SQL. For this post, I have chosen SQL, specifically PostgreSQL SQL dialect, which can be designated in the IntelliJ IDE. Below is an example of the first changeset, which creates four tables and two indexes.

img023_Change_Set

As shown below, change sets are stored in the db/changelog/changes sub-directory, as configured in the master change log file (db.changelog-master.yaml). Change set files follow an incremental naming convention.

img003C_IntelliJ_Liquibase_Changesets

The empty PostgreSQL database, before any Liquibase changes, should resemble the screengrab shown below.

img003_IntelliJ_Blank_Database_cropped

To automatically run Liquibase database migrations on startup, the org.liquibase:liquibase-core dependency must be added to the project’s build.gradle file. To apply the change sets to your local, empty PostgreSQL database, simply start the service locally with the gradle bootRun command. As the app starts after being compiled, any new Liquibase change sets will be applied.

img004_Gradle_bootRun

You might ask how does Liquibase know the change sets are new. During the initial startup of the Spring Boot application, in addition to any initial change sets, Liquibase creates two database tables to track changes, the databasechangelog and databasechangeloglock tables. Shown below are the two tables, along with the results of the four change sets included in the project, and applied by Liquibase to the local PostgreSQL elections database.

img005_IntelliJ_Initial_Database_cropped

Below we see the contents of the databasechangelog table, indicating that all four change sets were successfully applied to the database. Liquibase checks this table before applying change sets.

img006B_IntelliJ_Database_Change_Log

ElephantSQL

Before we can deploy our Spring Boot application to PWS, we need an accessible PostgreSQL instance in the Cloud; I have chosen ElephantSQL. Available through the Pivotal Services Marketplace, ElephantSQL currently offers one free and three paid service plans for their PostgreSQL as a Service. I purchased the Panda service plan as opposed to the free Turtle service plan. I found the free service plan was too limited in the maximum number of database connections for multiple service instances.

Previewing and purchasing an ElephantSQL service plan from the Pivotal Services Marketplace, assuming you have an existing PWS account, literally takes a single command (gist).

The output of the command should resemble the screengrab below. Note the total concurrent connections and total storage for each plan.

img007_PCF_ElephantSQL_Service_Purchase

To get details about the running ElephantSQL service, use the cf service elections command.

img007_PCF_ElephantSQL_Service_Info

From the ElephantSQL Console, we can obtain the connection information required to access our PostgreSQL elections database. You will need the default database name, username, password, and URL.

img012_PWS_ElephantSQL_Details

Service Binding

Once you have created the PostgreSQL database service, you need to bind the database service to the application. We will bind our application and the database, using the PCF deployment manifest file (manifest.yml), found in the project’s root directory. Binding is done using the services section (shown below).

The key/value pairs in the env section of the deployment manifest will become environment variables, local to the deployed Spring Boot service. These key/value pairs in the manifest will also override any configuration set in Spring’s external application properties file (application.yml). This file is located in the resources sub-directory. Note the SPRING_PROFILES_ACTIVE: test environment variable in the manifest.yml file. This variable designates which Spring Profile will be active from the multiple profiles defined in the application.yml file.

img008B_PCF_Manifest

Deployment to PWS

Next, we run gradle build followed by cf push to deploy one instance of the Spring Boot service to PWS and associate it with our ElephantSQL database instance. Below is the expected output from the cf push command.

img008_PCF_CF_Push

Note the route highlighted below. This is the URL where your Spring Boot service will be available.

img009_PCF_CF_Push2

To confirm your ElephantSQL database was populated by Liquibase when PWS started the deployed Spring application instance, we can check the ElephantSQL Console’s Stats tab. Note the database tables and rows in each table, signifying Liquibase ran successfully. Alternately, you could create another data source in your IDE, connected to ElephantSQL; this can be helpful for troubleshooting.

img013_Candidates

To access the running service and check that data is being returned, point your browser (or Postman) to the URL returned from the cf push command output (see second screengrab above) and hit the /candidates resource. Obviously, your URL, referred to as a route by PWS, will be different and unique. In the response payload, you should observe a JSON array of eight candidate objects. Each candidate was inserted into the Candidate table of the database, by Liquibase, when Liquibase executed the second of the four change sets on start-up.

img012_PWS_ElephantSQL

With Spring Boot Actuator and Spring Data REST, our simple Spring Boot application has dozens of resources exposed automatically, without extensive coding of resource controllers. Actuator exposes resources to help manage and troubleshoot the application, such as info, health, mappings (shown below), metrics, env, and configprops, among others. All Actuator resources are exposed explicitly, thus they can be disabled for Production deployments. With Spring Boot 2.0, all Actuator resources are now preceded with /actuator/ .

img029_Postman_Mappings

According to Pivotal, Spring Data REST builds on top of Spring Data repositories, analyzes an application’s domain model and exposes hypermedia-driven HTTP resources for aggregates contained in the model, such as our /candidates resource. A partial list of the application’s exposed resources are listed in the GitHub project’s README file.

In Spring’s approach to building RESTful web services, HTTP requests are handled by a controller. Spring Data REST automatically exposes CRUD resources for our entities. With Spring Data JPA, POJOs like our Candidate class are annotated with @Entity, indicating that it is a JPA entity. Lacking a @Table annotation, it is assumed that this entity will be mapped to a table named Candidate.

With Spring’s Data REST’s RESTful HTTP-based API, traditional database Create, Read, Update, and Delete commands for each PostgreSQL database table are automatically mapped to equivalent HTTP methods, including POST, GET, PUT, PATCH, and DELETE.

Below is an example, using Postman, to create a new Candidate using an HTTP POST method.

img029_Postman_Post

Below is an example, using Postman, to update a new Candidate using an HTTP PUT method.

img029_Postman_Put.PNG

With Spring Data REST, we can even retrieve data from read-only database Views, as shown below. This particular JSON response payload was returned from the candidates_by_elections database View, using the /election-candidates resource.

img028_Postman_View.PNG

Scaling Up

Once your application is deployed and you have tested its functionality, you can easily scale out or scale in the number instances, memory, and disk, with the cf scale command (gist).

Below is sample output from scaling up the Spring Boot application to two instances.

img016_Scale_Up2

Optionally, you can activate auto-scaling, which will allow the application to scale based on load.

img016_Autoscaling.PNG

Following the PCF architectural model, auto-scaling is actually another service from the Pivotal Services Marketplace, PCF App Autoscaler, as seen below, running alongside our ElephantSQL service.

img016_Autoscaling2.PNG

With PCF App Autoscaler, you set auto-scaling minimum and maximum instance limits and define scaling rules. Below, I have configured auto-scaling to scale out the number of application instances when the average CPU Utilization of all instances hits 80%. Conversely, the application will scale in when the average CPU Utilization recedes below 40%. In addition to CPU Utilization, PCF App Autoscaler also allows you to set scaling rules based on HTTP Throughput, HTTP Latency, RabbitMQ Depth (queue depth), and Memory Utilization.

Furthermore, I set the auto-scaling minimum number of instances to two and the maximum number of instances to four. No matter how much load is placed on the application, PWS will not scale above four instances. Conversely, PWS will maintain a minimum of two running instances at all times.

img016_Autoscaling3

Conclusion

This brief post demonstrates both the power and simplicity of Spring Boot to quickly develop highly-functional, data-centric RESTful API applications with minimal coding. Further, when coupled with Pivotal Cloud Foundry, Spring developers have a highly scalable, resilient cloud-native application hosting platform.

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