Archive for category PCF

Developing Cloud-Native Data-Centric Spring Boot Applications for Pivotal Cloud Foundry

In this post, we will explore the development of a cloud-native, data-centric Spring Boot 2.0 application, and its deployment to Pivotal Software’s hosted Pivotal Cloud Foundry service, Pivotal Web Services. We will add a few additional features, such as Spring Data, Lombok, and Swagger, to enhance our application.

According to Pivotal, Spring Boot makes it easy to create stand-alone, production-grade Spring-based Applications. Spring Boot takes an opinionated view of the Spring platform and third-party libraries. Spring Boot 2.0 just went GA on March 1, 2018. This is the first major revision of Spring Boot since 1.0 was released almost 4 years ago. It is also the first GA version of Spring Boot that provides support for Spring Framework 5.0.

Pivotal Web Services’ tagline is ‘The Agile Platform for the Agile Team Powered by Cloud Foundry’. According to Pivotal,  Pivotal Web Services (PWS) is a hosted environment of Pivotal Cloud Foundry (PCF). PWS is hosted on AWS in the US-East region. PWS utilizes two availability zones for redundancy. PWS provides developers a Spring-centric PaaS alternative to AWS Elastic Beanstalk, Elastic Container Service (Amazon ECS), and OpsWorks. With PWS, you get the reliability and security of AWS, combined with the rich-functionality and ease-of-use of PCF.

To demonstrate the feature-rich capabilities of the Spring ecosystem, the Spring Boot application shown in this post incorporates the following complimentary technologies:

  • Spring Boot Actuator: Sub-project of Spring Boot, adds several production grade services to Spring Boot applications with little developer effort
  • Spring Data JPA: Sub-project of Spring Data, easily implement JPA based repositories and data access layers
  • Spring Data REST: Sub-project of Spring Data, easily build hypermedia-driven REST web services on top of Spring Data repositories
  • Spring HATEOAS: Create REST representations that follow the HATEOAS principle from Spring-based applications
  • Springfox Swagger 2: We are using the Springfox implementation of the Swagger 2 specification, an automated JSON API documentation for API’s built with Spring
  • Lombok: The @Data annotation generates boilerplate code that is typically associated with simple POJOs (Plain Old Java Objects) and beans: @ToString, @EqualsAndHashCode, @Getter, @Setter, and @RequiredArgsConstructor

Source Code

All source code for this post can be found on GitHub. To get started quickly, use one of the two following commands (gist).

For this post, I have used JetBrains IntelliJ IDEA and Git Bash on Windows for development. However, all code should be compatible with most popular IDEs and development platforms. The project assumes you have Docker and the Cloud Foundry Command Line Interface (cf CLI) installed locally.

Code samples in this post are displayed as Gists, which may not display correctly on some mobile and social media browsers. Links to gists are also provided.

Demo Application

The Spring Boot application demonstrated in this post is a simple election-themed RESTful API. The app allows API consumers to create, read, update, and delete, candidates, elections, and votes, via its exposed RESTful HTTP-based resources.

The Spring Boot application consists of (7) JPA Entities that mirror the tables and views in the database, (7) corresponding Spring Data Repositories, (2) Spring REST Controller, (4) Liquibase change sets, and associated Spring, Liquibase, Swagger, and PCF configuration files. I have intentionally chosen to avoid the complexities of using Data Transfer Objects (DTOs) for brevity, albeit a security concern, and directly expose the entities as resources.

img022_Final_Project

Controller Resources

This application is a simple CRUD application. The application contains a few simple HTTP GET resources in each of the two controller classes, as an introduction to Spring REST controllers. For example, the CandidateController contains the /candidates/summary and /candidates/summary/{election} resources (shown below in Postman). Typically, you would expose your data to the end-user as controller resources, as opposed to exposing the entities directly. The ease of defining controller resources is one of the many powers of Spring Boot.

img025_CustomResource.PNG

Paging and Sorting

As an introduction to Spring Data’s paging and sorting features, both the VoteRepository and VotesElectionsViewRepository Repository Interfaces extend Spring Data’s PagingAndSortingRepository<T,ID> interface, instead of the default CrudRepository<T,ID> interface. With paging and sorting enabled, you may both sort and limit the amount of data returned in the response payload. For example, to reduce the size of your response payload, you might choose to page through the votes in blocks of 25 votes at a time. In that case, as shown below in Postman, if you needed to return just votes 26-50, you would append the /votes resource with ?page=1&size=25. Since paging starts on page 0 (zero), votes 26-50 will on page 1.

img024_Paging

Swagger

This project also includes the Springfox implementation of the Swagger 2 specification. Along with the Swagger 2 dependency, the project takes a dependency on io.springfox:springfox-swagger-ui. The Springfox Swagger UI dependency allows us to view and interactively test our controller resources through Swagger’s browser-based UI, as shown below.

img027B_Swagger

All Swagger configuration can be found in the project’s SwaggerConfig Spring Configuration class.

Gradle

This post’s Spring Boot application is built with Gradle, although it could easily be converted to Maven if desired. According to Gradle, Gradle is the modern tool used to build, automate and deliver everything from mobile apps to microservices.

Data

In real life, most applications interact with one or more data sources. The Spring Boot application demonstrated in this post interacts with data from a PostgreSQL database. PostgreSQL, or simply Postgres, is the powerful, open-source object-relational database system, which has supported production-grade applications for 15 years. The application’s single elections database consists of (6) tables, (3) views, and (2) function, which are both used to generate random votes for this demonstration.

img020_Database_Diagram

Spring Data makes interacting with PostgreSQL easy. In addition to the features of Spring Data, we will use Liquibase. Liquibase is known as the source control for your database. With Liquibase, your database development lifecycle can mirror your Spring development lifecycle. Both DDL (Data Definition Language) and DML (Data Manipulation Language) changes are versioned controlled, alongside the Spring Boot application source code.

Locally, we will take advantage of Docker to host our development PostgreSQL database, using the official PostgreSQL Docker image. With Docker, there is no messy database installation and configuration of your local development environment. Recreating and deleting your PostgreSQL database is simple.

To support the data-tier in our hosted PWS environment, we will implement ElephantSQL, an offering from the Pivotal Services Marketplace. ElephantSQL is a hosted version of PostgreSQL, running on AWS. ElephantSQL is referred to as PostgreSQL as a Service, or more generally, a Database as a Service or DBaaS. As a Pivotal Marketplace service, we will get easy integration with our PWS-hosted Spring Boot application, with near-zero configuration.

Docker

First, set up your local PostgreSQL database using Docker and the official PostgreSQL Docker image. Since this is only a local database instance, we will not worry about securing our database credentials (gist).

Your running PostgreSQL container should resemble the output shown below.

img001_docker

Data Source

Most IDEs allow you to create and save data sources. Although this is not a requirement, it makes it easier to view the database’s resources and table data. Below, I have created a data source in IntelliJ from the running PostgreSQL container instance. The port, username, password, and database name were all taken from the above Docker command.

img002_IntelliJ_Data_Source

Liquibase

There are multiple strategies when it comes to managing changes to your database. With Liquibase, each set of changes are handled as change sets. Liquibase describes a change set as an atomic change that you want to apply to your database. Liquibase offers multiple formats for change set files, including XML, JSON, YAML, and SQL. For this post, I have chosen SQL, specifically PostgreSQL SQL dialect, which can be designated in the IntelliJ IDE. Below is an example of the first changeset, which creates four tables and two indexes.

img023_Change_Set

As shown below, change sets are stored in the db/changelog/changes sub-directory, as configured in the master change log file (db.changelog-master.yaml). Change set files follow an incremental naming convention.

img003C_IntelliJ_Liquibase_Changesets

The empty PostgreSQL database, before any Liquibase changes, should resemble the screengrab shown below.

img003_IntelliJ_Blank_Database_cropped

To automatically run Liquibase database migrations on startup, the org.liquibase:liquibase-core dependency must be added to the project’s build.gradle file. To apply the change sets to your local, empty PostgreSQL database, simply start the service locally with the gradle bootRun command. As the app starts after being compiled, any new Liquibase change sets will be applied.

img004_Gradle_bootRun

You might ask how does Liquibase know the change sets are new. During the initial startup of the Spring Boot application, in addition to any initial change sets, Liquibase creates two database tables to track changes, the databasechangelog and databasechangeloglock tables. Shown below are the two tables, along with the results of the four change sets included in the project, and applied by Liquibase to the local PostgreSQL elections database.

img005_IntelliJ_Initial_Database_cropped

Below we see the contents of the databasechangelog table, indicating that all four change sets were successfully applied to the database. Liquibase checks this table before applying change sets.

img006B_IntelliJ_Database_Change_Log

ElephantSQL

Before we can deploy our Spring Boot application to PWS, we need an accessible PostgreSQL instance in the Cloud; I have chosen ElephantSQL. Available through the Pivotal Services Marketplace, ElephantSQL currently offers one free and three paid service plans for their PostgreSQL as a Service. I purchased the Panda service plan as opposed to the free Turtle service plan. I found the free service plan was too limited in the maximum number of database connections for multiple service instances.

Previewing and purchasing an ElephantSQL service plan from the Pivotal Services Marketplace, assuming you have an existing PWS account, literally takes a single command (gist).

The output of the command should resemble the screengrab below. Note the total concurrent connections and total storage for each plan.

img007_PCF_ElephantSQL_Service_Purchase

To get details about the running ElephantSQL service, use the cf service elections command.

img007_PCF_ElephantSQL_Service_Info

From the ElephantSQL Console, we can obtain the connection information required to access our PostgreSQL elections database. You will need the default database name, username, password, and URL.

img012_PWS_ElephantSQL_Details

Service Binding

Once you have created the PostgreSQL database service, you need to bind the database service to the application. We will bind our application and the database, using the PCF deployment manifest file (manifest.yml), found in the project’s root directory. Binding is done using the services section (shown below).

The key/value pairs in the env section of the deployment manifest will become environment variables, local to the deployed Spring Boot service. These key/value pairs in the manifest will also override any configuration set in Spring’s external application properties file (application.yml). This file is located in the resources sub-directory. Note the SPRING_PROFILES_ACTIVE: test environment variable in the manifest.yml file. This variable designates which Spring Profile will be active from the multiple profiles defined in the application.yml file.

img008B_PCF_Manifest

Deployment to PWS

Next, we run gradle build followed by cf push to deploy one instance of the Spring Boot service to PWS and associate it with our ElephantSQL database instance. Below is the expected output from the cf push command.

img008_PCF_CF_Push

Note the route highlighted below. This is the URL where your Spring Boot service will be available.

img009_PCF_CF_Push2

To confirm your ElephantSQL database was populated by Liquibase when PWS started the deployed Spring application instance, we can check the ElephantSQL Console’s Stats tab. Note the database tables and rows in each table, signifying Liquibase ran successfully. Alternately, you could create another data source in your IDE, connected to ElephantSQL; this can be helpful for troubleshooting.

img013_Candidates

To access the running service and check that data is being returned, point your browser (or Postman) to the URL returned from the cf push command output (see second screengrab above) and hit the /candidates resource. Obviously, your URL, referred to as a route by PWS, will be different and unique. In the response payload, you should observe a JSON array of eight candidate objects. Each candidate was inserted into the Candidate table of the database, by Liquibase, when Liquibase executed the second of the four change sets on start-up.

img012_PWS_ElephantSQL

With Spring Boot Actuator and Spring Data REST, our simple Spring Boot application has dozens of resources exposed automatically, without extensive coding of resource controllers. Actuator exposes resources to help manage and troubleshoot the application, such as info, health, mappings (shown below), metrics, env, and configprops, among others. All Actuator resources are exposed explicitly, thus they can be disabled for Production deployments. With Spring Boot 2.0, all Actuator resources are now preceded with /actuator/ .

img029_Postman_Mappings

According to Pivotal, Spring Data REST builds on top of Spring Data repositories, analyzes an application’s domain model and exposes hypermedia-driven HTTP resources for aggregates contained in the model, such as our /candidates resource. A partial list of the application’s exposed resources are listed in the GitHub project’s README file.

In Spring’s approach to building RESTful web services, HTTP requests are handled by a controller. Spring Data REST automatically exposes CRUD resources for our entities. With Spring Data JPA, POJOs like our Candidate class are annotated with @Entity, indicating that it is a JPA entity. Lacking a @Table annotation, it is assumed that this entity will be mapped to a table named Candidate.

With Spring’s Data REST’s RESTful HTTP-based API, traditional database Create, Read, Update, and Delete commands for each PostgreSQL database table are automatically mapped to equivalent HTTP methods, including POST, GET, PUT, PATCH, and DELETE.

Below is an example, using Postman, to create a new Candidate using an HTTP POST method.

img029_Postman_Post

Below is an example, using Postman, to update a new Candidate using an HTTP PUT method.

img029_Postman_Put.PNG

With Spring Data REST, we can even retrieve data from read-only database Views, as shown below. This particular JSON response payload was returned from the candidates_by_elections database View, using the /election-candidates resource.

img028_Postman_View.PNG

Scaling Up

Once your application is deployed and you have tested its functionality, you can easily scale out or scale in the number instances, memory, and disk, with the cf scale command (gist).

Below is sample output from scaling up the Spring Boot application to two instances.

img016_Scale_Up2

Optionally, you can activate auto-scaling, which will allow the application to scale based on load.

img016_Autoscaling.PNG

Following the PCF architectural model, auto-scaling is actually another service from the Pivotal Services Marketplace, PCF App Autoscaler, as seen below, running alongside our ElephantSQL service.

img016_Autoscaling2.PNG

With PCF App Autoscaler, you set auto-scaling minimum and maximum instance limits and define scaling rules. Below, I have configured auto-scaling to scale out the number of application instances when the average CPU Utilization of all instances hits 80%. Conversely, the application will scale in when the average CPU Utilization recedes below 40%. In addition to CPU Utilization, PCF App Autoscaler also allows you to set scaling rules based on HTTP Throughput, HTTP Latency, RabbitMQ Depth (queue depth), and Memory Utilization.

Furthermore, I set the auto-scaling minimum number of instances to two and the maximum number of instances to four. No matter how much load is placed on the application, PWS will not scale above four instances. Conversely, PWS will maintain a minimum of two running instances at all times.

img016_Autoscaling3

Conclusion

This brief post demonstrates both the power and simplicity of Spring Boot to quickly develop highly-functional, data-centric RESTful API applications with minimal coding. Further, when coupled with Pivotal Cloud Foundry, Spring developers have a highly scalable, resilient cloud-native application hosting platform.

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