Posts Tagged Cloud Computing

Infrastructure as Code Maturity Model

Systematically Evolving an Organization’s Infrastructure

Infrastructure and software development teams are increasingly building and managing infrastructure using automated tools that have been described as “infrastructure as code.” – Kief Morris (Infrastructure as Code)

The process of managing and provisioning computing infrastructure and their configuration through machine-processable, declarative, definition files, rather than physical hardware configuration or the use of interactive configuration tools. – Wikipedia (abridged)

Convergence of CD, Cloud, and IaC

In 2011, co-authors Jez Humble, formerly of ThoughtWorks, and David Farley, published their ground-breaking book, Continuous Delivery. Humble and Farley’s book set out, in their words, to automate the ‘painful, risky, and time-consuming process’ of the software ‘build, deployment, and testing process.

cd_image_02

Over the next five years, Humble and Farley’s Continuous Delivery made a significant contribution to the modern phenomena of DevOps. According to Wikipedia, DevOps is the ‘culture, movement or practice that emphasizes the collaboration and communication of both software developers and other information-technology (IT) professionals while automating the process of software delivery and infrastructure changes.

In parallel with the growth of DevOps, Cloud Computing continued to grow at an explosive rate. Amazon pioneered modern cloud computing in 2006 with the launch of its Elastic Compute Cloud. Two years later, in 2008, Microsoft launched its cloud platform, Azure. In 2010, Rackspace launched OpenStack.

Today, there is a flock of ‘cloud’ providers. Their services fall into three primary service models: Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS), Platform as a Service (PaaS), and Software as a Service (SaaS). Since we will be discussing infrastructure, we will focus on IaaS and PaaS. Leaders in this space include Google Cloud Platform, RedHat, Oracle Cloud, Pivotal Cloud Foundry, CenturyLink Cloud, Apprenda, IBM SmartCloud Enterprise, and Heroku, to mention just a few.

Finally, fast forward to June 2016, O’Reilly releases Infrastructure as Code
Managing Servers in the Cloud
, by Kief Morris, ThoughtWorks. This crucial work bridges many of the concepts first introduced in Humble and Farley’s Continuous Delivery, with the evolving processes and practices to support cloud computing.

cd_image_03

This post examines how to apply the principles found in the Continuous Delivery Maturity Model, an analysis tool detailed in Humble and Farley’s Continuous Delivery, and discussed herein, to the best practices found in Morris’ Infrastructure as Code.

Infrastructure as Code

Before we continue, we need a shared understanding of infrastructure as code. Below are four examples of infrastructure as code, as Wikipedia defined them, ‘machine-processable, declarative, definition files.’ The code was written using four popular tools, including HashiCorp Packer, Docker, AWS CloudFormation, and HashiCorp Terraform. Executing the code provisions virtualized cloud infrastructure.

HashiCorp Packer

Packer definition of an AWS EBS-backed AMI, based on Ubuntu.

{
  "variables": {
    "aws_access_key": "",
    "aws_secret_key": ""
  },
  "builders": [{
    "type": "amazon-ebs",
    "access_key": "{{user `aws_access_key`}}",
    "secret_key": "{{user `aws_secret_key`}}",
    "region": "us-east-1",
    "source_ami": "ami-fce3c696",
    "instance_type": "t2.micro",
    "ssh_username": "ubuntu",
    "ami_name": "packer-example {{timestamp}}"
  }]
}

Docker

Dockerfile, used to create a Docker image, and subsequently a Docker container, running MongoDB.

FROM ubuntu:16.04
MAINTAINER Docker
RUN apt-key adv --keyserver hkp://keyserver.ubuntu.com:80 --recv EA312927
RUN echo "deb http://repo.mongodb.org/apt/ubuntu" \
$(cat /etc/lsb-release | grep DISTRIB_CODENAME | cut -d= -f2)/mongodb-org/3.2 multiverse" | \
tee /etc/apt/sources.list.d/mongodb-org-3.2.list
RUN apt-get update && apt-get install -y mongodb-org
RUN mkdir -p /data/db
EXPOSE 27017
ENTRYPOINT ["/usr/bin/mongod"]

AWS CloudFormation

AWS CloudFormation declaration for three services enabled on a running instance.

services:
  sysvinit:
    nginx:
      enabled: "true"
      ensureRunning: "true"
      files:
        - "/etc/nginx/nginx.conf"
      sources:
        - "/var/www/html"
    php-fastcgi:
      enabled: "true"
      ensureRunning: "true"
      packages:
        yum:
          - "php"
          - "spawn-fcgi"
    sendmail:
      enabled: "false"
      ensureRunning: "false"

HashiCorp Terraform

Terraform definition of an AWS m1.small EC2 instance, running NGINX on Ubuntu.

resource "aws_instance" "web" {
  connection { user = "ubuntu" }
instance_type = "m1.small"
Ami = "${lookup(var.aws_amis, var.aws_region)}"
Key_name = "${aws_key_pair.auth.id}"
vpc_security_group_ids = ["${aws_security_group.default.id}"]
Subnet_id = "${aws_subnet.default.id}"
provisioner "remote-exec" {
  inline = [
    "sudo apt-get -y update",
    "sudo apt-get -y install nginx",
    "sudo service nginx start",
  ]
 }
}

Cloud-based Infrastructure as a Service

The previous examples provide but the narrowest of views into the potential breadth of infrastructure as code. Leading cloud providers, such as Amazon and Microsoft, offer hundreds of unique offerings, most of which may be defined and manipulated through code — infrastructure as code.

cd_image_05

cd_image_04

What Infrastructure as Code?

The question many ask is, what types of infrastructure can be defined as code? Although vendors and cloud providers have their unique names and descriptions, most infrastructure is divided into a few broad categories:

  • Compute
  • Databases, Caching, and Messaging
  • Storage, Backup, and Content Delivery
  • Networking
  • Security and Identity
  • Monitoring, Logging, and Analytics
  • Management Tooling

Continuous Delivery Maturity Model

We also need a common understanding of the Continuous Delivery Maturity Model. According to Humble and Farley, the Continuous Delivery Maturity Model was distilled as a model that ‘helps to identify where an organization stands in terms of the maturity of its processes and practices and defines a progression that an organization can work through to improve.

The Continuous Delivery Maturity Model is a 5×6 matrix, consisting of six areas of practice and five levels of maturity. Each of the matrix’s 30 elements defines a required discipline an organization needs to follow, to be considered at that level of maturity within that practice.

Areas of Practice

The CD Maturity Model examines six broad areas of practice found in most enterprise software organizations:

  • Build Management and Continuous Integration
  • Environments and Deployment
  • Release Management and Compliance
  • Testing
  • Data Management
  • Configuration Management

Levels of Maturity

The CD Maturity Model defines five level of increasing maturity, from a score of -1 to 3, from Regressive to Optimizing:

  • Level 3: Optimizing – Focus on process improvement
  • Level 2: Quantitatively Managed – Process measured and controlled
  • Level 1: Consistent – Automated processes applied across whole application lifecycle
  • Level 0: Repeatable – Process documented and partly automated
  • Level -1: Regressive – Processes unrepeatable, poorly controlled, and reactive

cd_image_06

Maturity Model Analysis

The CD Maturity Model is an analysis tool. In my experience, organizations use the maturity model in one of two ways. First, an organization completes an impartial evaluation of their existing levels of maturity across all areas of practice. Then, the organization focuses on improving the overall organization’s maturity, attempting to achieve a consistent level of maturity across all areas of practice. Alternately, the organization concentrates on a subset of the practices, which have the greatest business value, or given their relative immaturity, are a detriment to the other practices.

cd_image_01

* CD Maturity Model Analysis Tool available on GitHub.

Infrastructure as Code Maturity Levels

Although infrastructure as code is not explicitly called out as a practice in the CD Maturity Model, many of it’s best practices can be found in the maturity model. For example, the model prescribes automated environment provisioning, orchestrated deployments, and the use of metrics for continuous improvement.

Instead of trying to retrofit infrastructure as code into the existing CD Maturity Model, I believe it is more effective to independently apply the model’s five levels of maturity to infrastructure as code. To that end, I have selected many of the best practices from the book, Infrastructure as Code, as well as from my experiences. Those selected practices have been distributed across the model’s five levels of maturity.

The result is the first pass at an evolving Infrastructure as Code Maturity Model. This model may be applied alongside the broader CD Maturity Model, or independently, to evaluate and further develop an organization’s infrastructure practices.

IaC Level -1: Regressive

Processes unrepeatable, poorly controlled, and reactive

  • Limited infrastructure is provisioned and managed as code
  • Infrastructure provisioning still requires many manual processes
  • Infrastructure code is not written using industry-standard tooling and patterns
  • Infrastructure code not built, unit-tested, provisioned and managed, as part of a pipeline
  • Infrastructure code, processes, and procedures are inconsistently documented, and not available to all required parties

IaC Level 0: Repeatable

Processes documented and partly automated

  • All infrastructure code and configuration are stored in a centralized version control system
  • Testing, provisioning, and management of infrastructure are done as part of automated pipeline
  • Infrastructure is deployable as individual components
  • Leverages programmatic interfaces into physical devices
  • Automated security inspection of components and dependencies
  • Self-service CLI or API, where internal customers provision their resources
  • All code, processes, and procedures documented and available
  • Immutable infrastructure and processes

IaC Level 1: Consistent

Automated processes applied across whole application lifecycle

  • Fully automated provisioning and management of infrastructure
  • Minimal use of unsupported, ‘home-grown’ infrastructure tooling
  • Unit-tests meet code-coverage requirements
  • Code is continuously tested upon every check-in to version control system
  • Continuously available infrastructure using zero-downtime provisioning
  • Uses configuration registries
  • Templatized configuration files (no awk/sed magic)
  • Secrets are securely management
  • Auto-scaling based on user-defined load characteristics

IaC Level 2: Quantitatively Managed

Processes measured and controlled

  • Uses infrastructure definition files
  • Capable of automated rollbacks
  • Infrastructure and supporting systems are highly available and fault tolerant
  • Externalized configuration, no black box API to modify configuration
  • Fully monitored infrastructure with configurable alerting
  • Aggregated, auditable infrastructure logging
  • All code, processes, and procedures are well documented in a Knowledge Management System
  • Infrastructure code uses declarative versus imperative programming model, maybe…

IaC Level 3: Optimizing

Focus on process improvement

  • Self-healing, self-configurable, self-optimizing, infrastructure
  • Performance tested and monitored against business KPIs
  • Maximal infrastructure utilization and workload density
  • Adheres to Cloud Native and 12-Factor patterns
  • Cloud-agnostic code that minimizes cloud vendor lock-in

All opinions in this post are my own and not necessarily the views of my current employer or their clients.

, , , , , , ,

3 Comments