Database First Development with Entity Framework 5 in Visual Studio 2012

Build and test a Data Access Layer (DAL) using Entity Framework 5 and Database First Development in Visual Studio 2012. Use the Entity Framework Designer to build an ADO.NET Entity Data Model containing database tables, views, stored procedures, and scalar-valued functions. An updated version of this project’s source code, using EF6 is now available on GitHub. The GitHub repository contains all three Entity Framework blog posts.

HealthTracker EDMX Diagram

Introduction

In the last post, we explored Microsoft’s new Entity Framework 5 with Code First Development. In this post, we will explore Entity Framework 5 with Database First Development. We will be using the same data model as before. However, this time instead of POCOs, we will start with a SQL Server 2008 R2 database and use the Entity Framework Designer to build an ADO.NET Entity Data Model (EDM). In addition to database tables, we will look at Entity Framework’s ability to support database views (virtual tables), stored procedures, and scalar-valued functions.

Download a complete copy of the post’s source code, with SQL scripts to create the database objects and populate the database with sample data, from DropBox.

Entity Framework’s Code First and Model First development offer many great options for .NET developers. However, in my experience, most enterprise-level application developers work with a Database First Development model. Using Database First Development, Entity Framework 5 (EF5) provides the ability to construct a powerful yet easy-to-implement data access layer (DAL) between the database and the business logic.

The steps involved in this example are as follows:

  1. Create the new SQL Server database;
  2. Create the database objects;
  3. Create a new C# Class Library Project in Visual Studio 2012 Solution;
  4. Add a new ADO.NET Entity Data Model to project;
  5. Create a new Database Connection;
  6. Import the database objects into the EDM;
  7. Modify the EDM to accommodate the scalar-valued functions;
  8. Populate the database with sample data;
  9. Validate the EDM using a Unit Test Project;

Below is a final view of the entire Solution for reference as you work through the post.

Solution Explorer View of Final Solution

Solution Explorer View of Final Solution

The Database

Using SQL Server 2008 R2 Management Studio (SSMS), Toad for SQL, or similar application, create a new database, named ‘HealthTracker’. I left all the default database settings unchanged for this post.

Create the New Health Tracker Database

Create the New Health Tracker Database

Next, execute the supplied sql script to populate the HealthTracker database with the necessary database objects. The script should insert the following objects: (6) tables, (1) view, (1) stored procedure, (3) scalar-valued functions, and all the necessary table relationships. All objects will be members of the default ‘dbo’ schema.

Database in SQL Server Object Viewer

Database in SQL Server Object Viewer

Barring a few minor changes, this data model is identical to the one we built in the last post using Code First Development with POCOs. The below Database Diagram illustrates the one-to-many relationships between the tables. The tables are pluralized in the database, as opposed to singular in the ADO.NET Entity Data Model (Meals vs. Meal, People vs. Person, etc.). This is a common pattern with Entity Framework.

Database Diagram of Table Relationships

Database Diagram of Table Relationships

Optional: Setting Up Database Credentials

For security and simplicity, I choose to add a new Login, User, and Role to the database. This step is not necessary for this post. However, it is good to get into the habit of securing your database, using database Logins, Users, Roles, and Permissions. In addition, if you are planning to deploy the database and the DAL to other environments such as Test or Production, don’t tie your Solution to personal credentials, a machine-specific account, or to an administrative role in the database with overly broad permissions.

The Database User, DemoUser, is associated with the Login, DemoLogin. DemoUser is a member of the Database Role, DemoRole. I will use the DemoLogin account to connect the EDM to the database. DemoRole has the minimal required database permissions the Entity will need to function: Alter, Insert, Delete, Execute, Select, Update, and View definition. DemoUser only needs Connect permission. Again, this step is optional. You can use your own credentials if you choose.

Included with the downloadable code is a third sql script that should create the User, Role, Login, and required Permissions, if you choose to use them to follow along with the post.

Database Permissions for User and Role

Database Permissions for User and Role

The Data Access Layer

Following good software design principles, we will separate our concerns between Projects. We want to create a Data Access Layer (DAL), to act as an interface between our database and our business logic. We don’t want to interact with the data directly in our DAL Project. By separating the DAL into its own project, we can reference that project’s assembly (.dll) from any other project, be it another class library (our business logic), a WCF service, WPF, Silverlight or console application, or an ASP.NET site. To start, create a new Visual C# Class Library. Name it ‘HealthTracker.DataAccess.DbFirst’. Create a new Solution for the Project in the same dialog box, named ‘HealthTracker’.

New Visual C# Windows Class Library Project

New Visual C# Windows Class Library Project

First, install Entity Framework (System.Data.Entity namespace classes) into the Solution by right clicking on the Solution and selecting ‘Manage NuGet Packages for Solution…’. Install the ‘EntityFramework’ package. If you haven’t discovered the power of NuGet with Visual Studio, check out their site.

Manage NuGet Packages - Install EntityFramework Package

Manage NuGet Packages – Install EntityFramework Package

Next, add a new ‘ADO.NET Entity Data Model’ item, named ‘HealthTracker.edmx’, to the HealthTracker.DataAccess.DbFirst project. According to Microsoft, an .edmx file also contains information used by the ADO.NET Entity Data Model Designer (Entity Designer) to render a model graphically. An .edmx file is the combination of three metadata files: the conceptual schema definition language (CSDL), store schema definition language (SSDL), and mapping specification language (MSL) files. For more information, see .edmx File Overview (Entity Framework).

Adding the ADO.NET Entity Data Model to Project

Adding the ADO.NET Entity Data Model to Project

Adding the ADO.NET Entity Data Model item will start the Entity Data Model Wizard. Since we are exploring Database First Development, select ‘Generate from Database’.

Entity Data Model Wizard - Generate from Database

Entity Data Model Wizard – Generate from Database

Next, we will be prompted to choose a data connection. Since this is the first time we are accessing our newly created HealthTracker database, we need to create a new data connection. Select ‘New Connection…’

Entity Data Model Wizard - Choose Your Data Connection

The options you chose in the ‘Connection Properties’ dialog window, such as the server and instance name, will depend on your own SQL Server configuration and the method you chose to log onto the server. As mentioned before, I will use the ‘DemoLogin’ account. The connection string will reside in the project’s app.config file. Make sure to always chose ‘Test Connection’ to verify you have configured the Data Connection properly.

New Connection - Database Connection Properties

New Connection – Database Connection Properties

Once the data connection is established, we are prompted to add the database objects to the EDM. Only add the objects that we created earlier with the sql script.

Entity Data Model Wizard - Choose Your Database Objects

Entity Data Model Wizard – Choose Your Database Objects

When the import is complete, the EDM should look like the following in the Entity Designer. You should see the six table entities, with one-to-many associations between them, as well as the one view entity, ‘PersonSummaryView’. Each database object you imported is referred to as an entity. Drag the entities into any position you want on the Design surface.

HealthTracker Entity Data Model Diagram

HealthTracker Entity Data Model Diagram

Similarly, when the import is complete, the EDM should look like the following in the Model Browser.

Model Browser - View the of the Entity Data Model

Model Browser – View of the Entity Data Model

Stored Procedures

You recall we imported a stored procedure, ‘GetPersonSummary’. What happened to that object? In the Model Browser, double-click on the GetPersonSummary item under the Function Imports. The stored procedure was imported into the EDM by EF. The results the procedure returns from the database is associated with a new complex object type, ‘GetPersonSummary_Result’.

Function Import - Stored Procedure

Function Import – Stored Procedure

Scalar Functions

If you view the sql code for the above stored procedure, ‘GetPersonSummary’, you will note it calls three scalar-valued functions. These three happen to be the three functions we imported into the EDM. Each function takes a single input parameter, ‘personId’, and returns an integer value – the count of Meals, Activities, and Hydrations for a that Person, based on their Id.

We can also call the scalar-valued functions directly. Unfortunately, in my experience, working scalar-valued functions in Entity Framework is still not as easy as tables, views, and stored procedures. I have found two methods to work with scalar-valued functions. The first method is a bit of hack in my opinion, but it works. The method is documented in several Internet posts, including this one on Stack Overflow.

This method requires some minor changes of the .edmx file’s xml, directly. To do so, right-click on the .edmx file and select ‘Open With…’, ‘XML (Text) Editor’. This is how the functions looks in the .edmx file before changes:

<Function Name="CountActivities" ReturnType="int" Aggregate="false" BuiltIn="false" NiladicFunction="false" IsComposable="false" ParameterTypeSemantics="AllowImplicitConversion" Schema="dbo">
    <Parameter Name="personId" Type="int" Mode="In" />
</Function>
<Function Name="CountHydrations" ReturnType="int" Aggregate="false" BuiltIn="false" NiladicFunction="false" IsComposable="true" ParameterTypeSemantics="AllowImplicitConversion" Schema="dbo">
    <Parameter Name="personId" Type="int" Mode="In" />
</Function>
<Function Name="CountMeals" ReturnType="int" Aggregate="false" BuiltIn="false" NiladicFunction="false" IsComposable="true" ParameterTypeSemantics="AllowImplicitConversion" Schema="dbo">
    <Parameter Name="personId" Type="int" Mode="In" />
</Function>

Remove the ‘ReturnType’ attribute from the <Function /> element. Then, add a <CommandText /> element to each of the <Function /> elements. See the modified .edmx file below for the contents of the <CommandText /> elements.

<Function Name="CountActivities" Aggregate="false" BuiltIn="false" NiladicFunction="false" IsComposable="false" ParameterTypeSemantics="AllowImplicitConversion" Schema="dbo">
    <CommandText>
        SELECT [dbo].[CountActivities] (@personId)
    </CommandText>
    <Parameter Name="personId" Type="int" Mode="In" />
</Function>
<Function Name="CountHydrations" Aggregate="false" BuiltIn="false" NiladicFunction="false" IsComposable="true" ParameterTypeSemantics="AllowImplicitConversion" Schema="dbo">
    <CommandText>
        SELECT [dbo].[CountHydrations] (@personId)
    </CommandText>
    <Parameter Name="personId" Type="int" Mode="In" />
</Function>
<Function Name="CountMeals" Aggregate="false" BuiltIn="false" NiladicFunction="false" IsComposable="true" ParameterTypeSemantics="AllowImplicitConversion" Schema="dbo">
    <CommandText>
        SELECT [dbo].[CountMeals] (@personId)
    </CommandText>
    <Parameter Name="personId" Type="int" Mode="In" />
</Function>

Next, in the Model Browser, right-click on the ‘Function Imports’ folder and select ‘Add Function Import…’ This brings up the ‘Add Function Import’ dialog window. We will import the ‘CountActivities’ scalar-valued function to show this method. Enter the following information in the dialog window and select Save:

Function Import - Scalar-valued Function

Function Import – Scalar-valued Function

You can do the same for the other two scalar-valued functions, if you choose. We will only test the ‘CountActivities’ function, next with our Unit Tests. The downside of this method is the edits to the .edmx file will be lost when you update the EDM from the database. You will have to re-edit the .edmx file each time. This not a great solution.

The second method to call a scalar-valued function uses a feature of Entity Framework 5, the ‘Database.SqlQuery Method (String, Object[])’ Method. According to Microsoft, an instance of this class is obtained from an DbContext object and can be used to manage the actual database backing a DbContext or connection. Using ‘SqlQuery’ method, a raw SQL query that will return elements of the given generic type is created. The type can be any type that has properties that match the names of the columns returned from the query, or can be a simple primitive type.

Below is an example of the method’s use, similar to code in the Unit Test Project we will create next, to test our EDM.

using (HealthTrackerEntities context = new HealthTrackerEntities())
{
    string sqlQuery = "SELECT [dbo].[CountMeals] ({0})";
    Object[] parameters = { 1 };
    int activityCount = db.Database.SqlQuery<int>(sqlQuery, parameters).FirstOrDefault();
}

This method allows us to call the scalar-valued function directly from the database, just as we could any other object using a sql query. The downside of this method is that we are not really taking advantage of the EDM we constructed. It is easier than the first method and it doesn’t need continued changes if we update the EDM. Undoubtedly, there are better methods out there than I have presented here.

Testing the Entity Data Model

To confirm that the EDM is functioning properly, we will create and execute a series of Unit Tests. In reality, although we will be using Visual Studio’s Unit Test Project type, the tests are more like functional tests than true unit tests. This is especially true because we are writing the tests after we have completed development our DAL’s EDM.

We will perform minimal testing of the EDM’s tables, view, stored procedure, and scalar-valued functions, with a series of several simple tests. The tests are only meant to demonstrate the type of tests you could use across all entities in the Model to confirm various functions.

Sample Data

In SSMS or VS2012, execute the supplied sql script that populates the database with test data. The script contains a variety of Meal Types, Activity Types, People, Meals, Activities, and Hydrations table records. Note the script deletes all existing data from those tables. Below is a sample of the Meal table’s sample data.

Sample Meal Data

Sample Meal Data

The Unit Test Project

After adding the sample data to the HealthTracker database, add a new Visual Studio 2012 Unit Test Project, named ‘HealthTracker.UnitTests’, to the ‘HealthTracker’ Solution.

Add New Unit Test Project to Solution

Add New Unit Test Project to Solution

Next, add a Reference to the Unit Test Project from our DAL, the ‘HealthTracker.DataAccess.DbFirst’ Project. This step adds the ‘HealthTracker.DataAccess.DbFirst.dll’ assembly to our Unit Test Project.

Add Entity Data Model Project Reference to Unit Test Project

Add Entity Data Model Project Reference to Unit Test Project

Next, we need to add the same Database Connection we used in the ‘HealthTracker.DataAccess.DbFirst’ Project, to this Project. I always forget this step and end up with a database connection error the first time I try to run a new project. Right-click on the Unit Test Project and select ‘Add New Item…’ Add an ‘Application Configuration File’ item, named ‘app.config’, to the Unit Test Project.

Add Application Configuration File to Unit Test Project

Add Application Configuration File to Unit Test Project

Open the corresponding Application Configuration File in the ‘HealthTracker.DataAccess.DbFirst’ Project and copy the <connectionStrings /> element to our Unit Test Project’s app.config file. The file’s contents should look similar to the following when complete (note, your ‘connectionString’ attribute will have different values).

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8" ?>
<configuration>
    <connectionStrings>
        <add name="HealthTrackerEntities" connectionString="metadata=res://*/HealthTracker.csdl|res://*/HealthTracker.ssdl|res://*/HealthTracker.msl;provider=System.Data.SqlClient;provider connection string=&quot;data source=gstafford-windows-laptop\DEVELOPMENT;initial catalog=HealthTracker;persist security info=True;user id=DemoLogin;password=DemoLogin123;MultipleActiveResultSets=True;App=EntityFramework&quot;" providerName="System.Data.EntityClient" />
    </connectionStrings>
</configuration>

Lastly, rename the default ‘UnitTest’ class in the Unit Test Project to ‘HealthTrackerUnitTests’. Enter or copy and paste the contents of the supplied HealthTrackerUnitTests.cs file to this file. The supplied file contains all the unit tests.

using System.Linq;
using Microsoft.VisualStudio.TestTools.UnitTesting;
using HealthTracker.DataAccess.DbFirst;

namespace HealthTracker.UnitTests
{
    [TestClass]
    public class HealthTrackerUnitTests
    {
        private const string PersonOriginal = "John Doe";
        private const string PersonNew = "New Person";
        private const string PersonNameUpdated = "Updated Name";

        /// <summary>
        /// Delete any non-sample People from the database created by previous tests
        /// </summary>
        [TestInitialize]
        public void RemoveNonSamplePeople()
        {
            using (var db = new HealthTrackerEntities())
            {
                var peopleToDelete = db.People
                    .Where(person => person.PersonId > 4);

                foreach (var personToDelete in peopleToDelete)
                {
                    db.People.Remove(personToDelete);
                }
                db.SaveChanges();
            }
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Return the count of People in the database, which should be 4.
        /// </summary>
        [TestMethod]
        public void PersonCountTest()
        {
            using (var db = new HealthTrackerEntities())
            {
                var personCount = (db.People.Select(p => p)).Count();
                Assert.IsTrue(personCount > 0);
            }
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Return the PersonId of 'John Doe', which should be is 1.
        /// </summary>
        [TestMethod]
        public void PersonIdTest()
        {
            using (var db = new HealthTrackerEntities())
            {
                var personId = db.People
                    .Where(person => person.Name == PersonOriginal)
                    .Select(person => person.PersonId)
                    .First();
                Assert.AreEqual(1, personId);
            }
        }
        /// <summary>
        /// Insert a new Person into the database.
        /// </summary>
        [TestMethod]
        public void PersonAddNewTest()
        {
            using (var db = new HealthTrackerEntities())
            {
                // Setup test
                db.People.Add(new Person { Name = PersonNew });
                db.SaveChanges();

                // Test 1
                var personCount = (db.People.Select(p => p)).Count();
                Assert.AreEqual(5, personCount);

                // Test 2
                var newPersonFound = db.People.FirstOrDefault(
                    person => person.Name == PersonNew);
                Assert.IsNotNull(newPersonFound);
            }
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Update a Person's name in the database.
        /// </summary>
        [TestMethod]
        public void PersonUpdateNameTest()
        {
            using (var db = new HealthTrackerEntities())
            {
                // Setup test
                var personToUpdate = db.People.FirstOrDefault(
                    person => person.Name == PersonOriginal);

                if (personToUpdate != null) personToUpdate.Name = PersonNameUpdated;
                db.SaveChanges();

                // Test
                var updatedPerson = db.People.FirstOrDefault(
                    person => person.Name == PersonNameUpdated);
                Assert.IsNotNull(updatedPerson);

                // Tear down test
                var personToRevert = db.People.FirstOrDefault(
                    person => person.Name == PersonNameUpdated);

                if (personToRevert != null) personToRevert.Name = PersonOriginal;
                db.SaveChanges();
            }
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Return the Meal count from PersonSummaryViews database view, which should be 21.
        /// </summary>
        [TestMethod]
        public void PersonSummaryViewTest()
        {
            using (var db = new HealthTrackerEntities())
            {
                var mealCount = (db.PersonSummaryViews
                    .Where(p => p.PersonId == 1)
                    .Select(p => p.MealsCount))
                    .First();
                Assert.AreEqual(21, mealCount);
            }
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Call CountActivities scalar-valued function directly from in the database.
        /// </summary>
        [TestMethod]
        public void ActivtyCountFunctionFromDatabaseTest()
        {
            using (var db = new HealthTrackerEntities())
            {
                object[] parameters = { 1 };
                var activityCount = db.Database.SqlQuery<int>(
                    "SELECT [dbo].[CountActivities] ({0})",
                    parameters).FirstOrDefault();
                Assert.AreEqual(7, activityCount);
            }
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Call CountActivities scalar-valued function from the Entity Data Model.
        /// </summary>
        [TestMethod]
        public void ActivtyCountFunctionFromEntityTest()
        {
            using (var db = new HealthTrackerEntities())
            {
                var activityCount = db.CountActivities(1).First();
                if (activityCount != null) activityCount = activityCount.Value;
                Assert.AreEqual(7, activityCount);
            }
        }
    }
}

When complete, build the Solution. Then finally, from the Test menu in the top Visual Studio menu bar, or by right clicking on the ‘HealthTrackerUnitTests’, run all Unit Tests. The test results should look like the following.

Test Explorer Showing Results of Unit Tests

Test Explorer Showing Results of Unit Tests

Conclusion

Congratulations, we have built and tested a Data Access Layer using Entity Framework 5. The DAL can now be referenced from a middle-tier business assemble, WCF Service, or directly from a client application.

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  1. #1 by Francisco Devia Cuenca on January 22, 2013 - 5:34 pm

    Hi,
    Trying to run the test in the line
    using (var db = new HealthTrackerEntities())

    I get the error:

    ‘HealthTracker.DataAccess.DbFirst.HealthTrackerEntities’:type used in using statment must be implicity convertible to ‘System.IDisposable’

    Thanks in Advanced for you help

    • #2 by André L Sobreiro on December 19, 2013 - 7:01 pm

      Hi,

      I got this error too.
      The problem was related to some referece files missing, like EntityFramework.dll, System.Data.Entity and also, the using statement at the beggining of the class pointing to the System.Data.Entity namespace.

      Hope this helps

      Regards,
      André Sobreiro

  2. #3 by Vijay Prativadi on February 19, 2013 - 9:33 am

    I call this as Awesome ! Cheers !

  3. #4 by xudong125 on February 27, 2013 - 12:06 am

    hi,why entity framework 5 function import list is empty? in fact there are two function in database

    • #5 by Gary A. Stafford on February 27, 2013 - 7:11 am

      That is explained in post. It discusses how to import functions.

  4. #6 by Martyn on May 7, 2013 - 9:20 am

    Hey Gary, Great post. However, your work around for Importing Scalar functions did not work for me. Kept getting a ReturnType required message, edmx xml was not well formed and hence could not load the model view to continue. Any ideas?

    • #7 by Barak on August 13, 2013 - 2:40 pm

      Any luck? I am also seeing that the XML was not well formed after I removed the “ReturnType”.

      -Thanks

  5. #8 by omisayeinfotechBartholomew on July 2, 2013 - 5:57 am

    Hello to all my brother.pls i’m new to restful web service and also new in using the new apache TomeePlus .My aim of using restful webservice is to integrate it in my web e-comerce websit.

    FIRST:
    My IDE is Netbeans 7.3.1,
    In my sql ,I built a database called oko which is made up on table with ID,firstname and Lastname, this is just for testing purposes.
    in My netbeans i built a web app called AGAIN
    in thsi AGAIN I built entity beans from my Mysql database,”entity class = Oko.java”
    i built restful web service from entity class “Oko.java”;
    i used glassfish server 3.2.
    when i tested the restful webservice it work pretty well.
    i was very happy with this !!.

    SECOND :
    Now i tried to do thesame thing with my apache TomeePlus server ,
    but it is not working .
    i included “mysql driver jar file ” to TomeePlus /lib,
    it gave my an error which has kept me one week trying to resolve.

    ERROR :
    SEVERE: Servlet.service() for servlet [ServletAdaptor] in context with path [/AGAIN] threw exception
    java.lang.NullPointerException
    at service.AbstractFacade.findAll(AbstractFacade.java:40)
    at service.OkoFacadeREST.findAll(OkoFacadeREST.java:66)
    at sun.reflect.NativeMethodAccessorImpl.invoke0(Native Method)
    at sun.reflect.NativeMethodAccessorImpl.invoke(NativeMethodAccessorImpl.java:57)
    at sun.reflect.DelegatingMethodAccessorImpl.invoke(DelegatingMethodAccessorImpl.java:43)
    at java.lang.reflect.Method.invoke(Method.java:606)
    at com.sun.jersey.spi.container.JavaMethodInvokerFactory$1.invoke(JavaMethodInvokerFactory.java:60)
    at com.sun.jersey.server.impl.model.method.dispatch.AbstractResourceMethodDispatchProvider$TypeOutInvoker._dispatch(AbstractResourceMethodDispatchProvider.java:185)
    at com.sun.jersey.server.impl.model.method.dispatch.ResourceJavaMethodDispatcher.dispatch(ResourceJavaMethodDispatcher.java:75)
    at com.sun.jersey.server.impl.uri.rules.HttpMethodRule.accept(HttpMethodRule.java:302)
    at com.sun.jersey.server.impl.uri.rules.ResourceClassRule.accept(ResourceClassRule.java:108)
    at com.sun.jersey.server.impl.uri.rules.RightHandPathRule.accept(RightHandPathRule.java:147)
    at com.sun.jersey.server.impl.uri.rules.RootResourceClassesRule.accept(RootResourceClassesRule.java:84)
    at com.sun.jersey.server.impl.application.WebApplicationImpl._handleRequest(WebApplicationImpl.java:1480)
    at com.sun.jersey.server.impl.application.WebApplicationImpl._handleRequest(WebApplicationImpl.java:1411)
    at com.sun.jersey.server.impl.application.WebApplicationImpl.handleRequest(WebApplicationImpl.java:1360)
    at com.sun.jersey.server.impl.application.WebApplicationImpl.handleRequest(WebApplicationImpl.java:1350)
    at com.sun.jersey.spi.container.servlet.WebComponent.service(WebComponent.java:416)
    at com.sun.jersey.spi.container.servlet.ServletContainer.service(ServletContainer.java:538)
    at com.sun.jersey.spi.container.servlet.ServletContainer.service(ServletContainer.java:716)
    at javax.servlet.http.HttpServlet.service(HttpServlet.java:728)
    at org.apache.catalina.core.ApplicationFilterChain.internalDoFilter(ApplicationFilterChain.java:305)
    at org.apache.catalina.core.ApplicationFilterChain.doFilter(ApplicationFilterChain.java:210)
    at org.apache.catalina.core.StandardWrapperValve.invoke(StandardWrapperValve.java:222)
    at org.apache.catalina.core.StandardContextValve.invoke(StandardContextValve.java:123)
    at org.apache.catalina.authenticator.AuthenticatorBase.invoke(AuthenticatorBase.java:472)
    at org.apache.catalina.core.StandardHostValve.invoke(StandardHostValve.java:171)
    at org.apache.catalina.valves.ErrorReportValve.invoke(ErrorReportValve.java:99)
    at org.apache.catalina.valves.AccessLogValve.invoke(AccessLogValve.java:936)
    at org.apache.catalina.core.StandardEngineValve.invoke(StandardEngineValve.java:118)
    at org.apache.catalina.connector.CoyoteAdapter.service(CoyoteAdapter.java:407)
    at org.apache.coyote.http11.AbstractHttp11Processor.process(AbstractHttp11Processor.java:1004)
    at org.apache.coyote.AbstractProtocol$AbstractConnectionHandler.process(AbstractProtocol.java:589)
    at org.apache.tomcat.util.net.JIoEndpoint$SocketProcessor.run(JIoEndpoint.java:312)
    at java.util.concurrent.ThreadPoolExecutor.runWorker(ThreadPoolExecutor.java:1145)
    at java.util.concurrent.ThreadPoolExecutor$Worker.run(ThreadPoolExecutor.java:615)
    at java.lang.Thread.run(Thread.java:724)

    WEB.XML:
    My web.xml file looks like this

    ServletAdaptor
    com.sun.jersey.spi.container.servlet.ServletContainer

    Multiple packages, separated by semicolon(;), can be specified in param-value
    com.sun.jersey.config.property.packages
    service

    com.sun.jersey.api.json.POJOMappingFeature
    true

    1

    ServletAdaptor
    /webresources/*

    30

    CONTEXT.XML:

    My context.xml file looks like this

    PERSISTENCE.XML:

    My persistence .xml file looks like this

    org.eclipse.persistence.jpa.PersistenceProvider
    PAC.Oko
    false

    .Please brothers this has kept me almost a week of nigthless sleep.
    i need your help and support pleas.
    You can also contact me via E-mail :omisaye_infotech@yahoo.com
    THANKS FOR YOUR HELP!!

  6. #9 by omisayeinfotechBartholomew on July 2, 2013 - 6:04 am

    Hello Mr Gary A.i am Bartholomew from Nigeria. i’m new to restful web service and also new in using the new apache TomeePlus .My aim of using restful webservice is to integrate it in my web e-comerce websit.

    FIRST:
    My IDE is Netbeans 7.3.1,
    In my sql ,I built a database called oko which is made up of a table okolo ,with ID,firstname and Lastname as columns, this is just for testing purposes.
    in My netbeans i built a web app called AGAIN
    in this AGAIN I built entity beans from my Mysql database,”entity class = Oko.java”
    i built restful web service from entity class “Oko.java”;
    i used glassfish server 3.2.
    when i tested the restful webservice it work pretty well.
    i was very happy with this !!.

    SECOND :
    Now i tried to do the same thing with my apache TomeePlus server ,
    but it is not working .
    i included “mysql driver jar file ” to TomeePlus /lib,
    i Fololwed the step on FIRST:
    it gave me an error which has kept me one week trying to resolve.

    ERROR :
    SEVERE: Servlet.service() for servlet [ServletAdaptor] in context with path [/AGAIN] threw exception
    java.lang.NullPointerException
    at service.AbstractFacade.findAll(AbstractFacade.java:40)
    at service.OkoFacadeREST.findAll(OkoFacadeREST.java:66)
    at sun.reflect.NativeMethodAccessorImpl.invoke0(Native Method)
    at sun.reflect.NativeMethodAccessorImpl.invoke(NativeMethodAccessorImpl.java:57)
    at sun.reflect.DelegatingMethodAccessorImpl.invoke(DelegatingMethodAccessorImpl.java:43)
    at java.lang.reflect.Method.invoke(Method.java:606)
    at com.sun.jersey.spi.container.JavaMethodInvokerFactory$1.invoke(JavaMethodInvokerFactory.java:60)
    at com.sun.jersey.server.impl.model.method.dispatch.AbstractResourceMethodDispatchProvider$TypeOutInvoker._dispatch(AbstractResourceMethodDispatchProvider.java:185)
    at com.sun.jersey.server.impl.model.method.dispatch.ResourceJavaMethodDispatcher.dispatch(ResourceJavaMethodDispatcher.java:75)
    at com.sun.jersey.server.impl.uri.rules.HttpMethodRule.accept(HttpMethodRule.java:302)
    at com.sun.jersey.server.impl.uri.rules.ResourceClassRule.accept(ResourceClassRule.java:108)
    at com.sun.jersey.server.impl.uri.rules.RightHandPathRule.accept(RightHandPathRule.java:147)
    at com.sun.jersey.server.impl.uri.rules.RootResourceClassesRule.accept(RootResourceClassesRule.java:84)
    at com.sun.jersey.server.impl.application.WebApplicationImpl._handleRequest(WebApplicationImpl.java:1480)
    at com.sun.jersey.server.impl.application.WebApplicationImpl._handleRequest(WebApplicationImpl.java:1411)
    at com.sun.jersey.server.impl.application.WebApplicationImpl.handleRequest(WebApplicationImpl.java:1360)
    at com.sun.jersey.server.impl.application.WebApplicationImpl.handleRequest(WebApplicationImpl.java:1350)
    at com.sun.jersey.spi.container.servlet.WebComponent.service(WebComponent.java:416)
    at com.sun.jersey.spi.container.servlet.ServletContainer.service(ServletContainer.java:538)
    at com.sun.jersey.spi.container.servlet.ServletContainer.service(ServletContainer.java:716)
    at javax.servlet.http.HttpServlet.service(HttpServlet.java:728)
    at org.apache.catalina.core.ApplicationFilterChain.internalDoFilter(ApplicationFilterChain.java:305)
    at org.apache.catalina.core.ApplicationFilterChain.doFilter(ApplicationFilterChain.java:210)
    at org.apache.catalina.core.StandardWrapperValve.invoke(StandardWrapperValve.java:222)
    at org.apache.catalina.core.StandardContextValve.invoke(StandardContextValve.java:123)
    at org.apache.catalina.authenticator.AuthenticatorBase.invoke(AuthenticatorBase.java:472)
    at org.apache.catalina.core.StandardHostValve.invoke(StandardHostValve.java:171)
    at org.apache.catalina.valves.ErrorReportValve.invoke(ErrorReportValve.java:99)
    at org.apache.catalina.valves.AccessLogValve.invoke(AccessLogValve.java:936)
    at org.apache.catalina.core.StandardEngineValve.invoke(StandardEngineValve.java:118)
    at org.apache.catalina.connector.CoyoteAdapter.service(CoyoteAdapter.java:407)
    at org.apache.coyote.http11.AbstractHttp11Processor.process(AbstractHttp11Processor.java:1004)
    at org.apache.coyote.AbstractProtocol$AbstractConnectionHandler.process(AbstractProtocol.java:589)
    at org.apache.tomcat.util.net.JIoEndpoint$SocketProcessor.run(JIoEndpoint.java:312)
    at java.util.concurrent.ThreadPoolExecutor.runWorker(ThreadPoolExecutor.java:1145)
    at java.util.concurrent.ThreadPoolExecutor$Worker.run(ThreadPoolExecutor.java:615)
    at java.lang.Thread.run(Thread.java:724)

    PERSISTENCE.XML:

    My persistence .xml file looks like this

    org.eclipse.persistence.jpa.PersistenceProvider
    PAC.Oko
    false

    CONTEXT.XML:

    My context.xml file looks like this

    WEB.XML:
    My web.xml file looks like this

    ServletAdaptor
    com.sun.jersey.spi.container.servlet.ServletContainer

    Multiple packages, separated by semicolon(;), can be specified in param-value
    com.sun.jersey.config.property.packages
    service

    com.sun.jersey.api.json.POJOMappingFeature
    true

    1

    ServletAdaptor
    /webresources/*

    30

  7. #10 by John Melkerson on August 8, 2013 - 9:23 am

    Gary,

    Thank you for the fantastically thorough post! You are to be commended.

    I have an issue, however, that I hope you can help me get past. I have created the empty HealthTracker database in SQL 2012. When I run the Health_Tracker_Create_All_Objects script, SSMS complains that Database ‘$(DatabaseName)’ does not exist. Make sure that the name is entered correctly. Should something be substituted for DatabaseName? What are the implications of this error?

    Thanks,

    John Melkerson

  8. #11 by Tony Sellars on August 27, 2013 - 10:34 am

    John –

    The error you are seeing with is due to a sql scripting variable not being defined. In this case you can simply remove comment out the entire line since you will be running the script against the HealthTracker database already and there are not any other use statements in the script. Alternately, you could add the following line to the start of the script:

    :setvar DatabaseName “HealthTracker”

    To allow for executing in sqlcmd mode – select the “Query” menu and select “SQLCMD mode”. the line above should then have grey highlight over it.

    Hope this helps.
    –Tony Sellars

  9. #12 by bcbeatty on January 22, 2014 - 11:50 am

    How do I read the Entity Framework Model and validate it against a given connection?
    I want to ensure the model matches the database after a migration. but I don’t want to execute the stored procedures, just validate they exist.
    Thanks

  1. Scalar valued function calling in Entity Framework 6 - BlogoSfera

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