Posts Tagged VirtualBox

Spring Music Revisited: Java-Spring-MongoDB Web App with Docker 1.12

Build, test, deploy, and monitor a multi-container, MongoDB-backed, Java Spring web application, using the new Docker 1.12.

Spring Music Infrastructure

Introduction

** This post and associated project code were updated 9/3/2016 to use Tomcat 8.5.4 with OpenJDK 8.**

This post and the post’s example project represent an update to a previous post, Build and Deploy a Java-Spring-MongoDB Application using Docker. This new post incorporates many improvements made in Docker 1.12, including the use of the new Docker Compose v2 YAML format. The post’s project was also updated to use Filebeat with ELK, as opposed to Logspout, which was used previously.

In this post, we will demonstrate how to build, test, deploy, and manage a Java Spring web application, hosted on Apache Tomcat, load-balanced by NGINX, monitored by ELK with Filebeat, and all containerized with Docker.

We will use a sample Java Spring application, Spring Music, available on GitHub from Cloud Foundry. The Spring Music sample record album collection application was originally designed to demonstrate the use of database services on Cloud Foundry, using the Spring Framework. Instead of Cloud Foundry, we will host the Spring Music application locally, using Docker on VirtualBox, and optionally on AWS.

All files necessary to build this project are stored on the docker_v2 branch of the garystafford/spring-music-docker repository on GitHub. The Spring Music source code is stored on the springmusic_v2 branch of the garystafford/spring-music repository, also on GitHub.

Spring Music Application

Application Architecture

The Java Spring Music application stack contains the following technologies: JavaSpring Framework, AngularJS, Bootstrap, jQueryNGINXApache TomcatMongoDB, the ELK Stack, and Filebeat. Testing frameworks include the Spring MVC Test Framework, Mockito, Hamcrest, and JUnit.

A few changes were made to the original Spring Music application to make it work for this demonstration, including:

  • Move from Java 1.7 to 1.8 (including newer Tomcat version)
  • Add unit tests for Continuous Integration demonstration purposes
  • Modify MongoDB configuration class to work with non-local, containerized MongoDB instances
  • Add Gradle warNoStatic task to build WAR without static assets
  • Add Gradle zipStatic task to ZIP up the application’s static assets for deployment to NGINX
  • Add Gradle zipGetVersion task with a versioning scheme for build artifacts
  • Add context.xml file and MANIFEST.MF file to the WAR file
  • Add Log4j RollingFileAppender appender to send log entries to Filebeat
  • Update versions of several dependencies, including Gradle, Spring, and Tomcat

We will use the following technologies to build, publish, deploy, and host the Java Spring Music application: GradlegitGitHubTravis CIOracle VirtualBoxDockerDocker ComposeDocker MachineDocker Hub, and optionally, Amazon Web Services (AWS).

NGINX
To increase performance, the Spring Music web application’s static content will be hosted by NGINX. The application’s WAR file will be hosted by Apache Tomcat 8.5.4. Requests for non-static content will be proxied through NGINX on the front-end, to a set of three load-balanced Tomcat instances on the back-end. To further increase application performance, NGINX will also be configured for browser caching of the static content. In many enterprise environments, the use of a Java EE application server, like Tomcat, is still not uncommon.

Reverse proxying and caching are configured thought NGINX’s default.conf file, in the server configuration section:

The three Tomcat instances will be manually configured for load-balancing using NGINX’s default round-robin load-balancing algorithm. This is configured through the default.conf file, in the upstream configuration section:

Client requests are received through port 80 on the NGINX server. NGINX redirects requests, which are not for non-static assets, to one of the three Tomcat instances on port 8080.

MongoDB
The Spring Music application was designed to work with a number of data stores, including MySQL, Postgres, Oracle, MongoDB, Redis, and H2, an in-memory Java SQL database. Given the choice of both SQL and NoSQL databases, we will select MongoDB.

The Spring Music application, hosted by Tomcat, will store and modify record album data in a single instance of MongoDB. MongoDB will be populated with a collection of album data from a JSON file, when the Spring Music application first creates the MongoDB database instance.

ELK
Lastly, the ELK Stack with Filebeat, will aggregate NGINX, Tomcat, and Java Log4j log entries, providing debugging and analytics to our demonstration. A similar method for aggregating logs, using Logspout instead of Filebeat, can be found in this previous post.

Kibana 4 Web Console

Continuous Integration

In this post’s example, two build artifacts, a WAR file for the application and ZIP file for the static web content, are built automatically by Travis CI, whenever source code changes are pushed to the springmusic_v2 branch of the garystafford/spring-music repository on GitHub.

Travis CI Output

Following a successful build and a small number of unit tests, Travis CI pushes the build artifacts to the build-artifacts branch on the same GitHub project. The build-artifacts branch acts as a pseudo binary repository for the project, much like JFrog’s Artifactory. These artifacts are used later by Docker to build the project’s immutable Docker images and containers.

Build Artifact Repository

Build Notifications
Travis CI pushes build notifications to a Slack channel, which eliminates the need to actively monitor Travis CI.

Travis CI Slack Notifications

Automation Scripting
The .travis.yaml file, custom gradle.build Gradle tasks, and the deploy_travisci.sh script handles the Travis CI automation described, above.

Travis CI .travis.yaml file:

Custom gradle.build tasks:

The deploy.sh file:

You can easily replicate the project’s continuous integration automation using your choice of toolchains. GitHub or BitBucket are good choices for distributed version control. For continuous integration and deployment, I recommend Travis CI, Semaphore, Codeship, or Jenkins. Couple those with a good persistent chat application, such as Glider Labs’ Slack or Atlassian’s HipChat.

Building the Docker Environment

Make sure VirtualBox, Docker, Docker Compose, and Docker Machine, are installed and running. At the time of this post, I have the following versions of software installed on my Mac:

  • Mac OS X 10.11.6
  • VirtualBox 5.0.26
  • Docker 1.12.1
  • Docker Compose 1.8.0
  • Docker Machine 0.8.1

To build the project’s VirtualBox VM, Docker images, and Docker containers, execute the build script, using the following command: sh ./build_project.sh. A build script is useful when working with CI/CD automation tools, such as Jenkins CI or ThoughtWorks go. However, to understand the build process, I suggest first running the individual commands, locally.

Deploying to AWS
By simply changing the Docker Machine driver to AWS EC2 from VirtualBox, and providing your AWS credentials, the springmusic environment may also be built on AWS.

Build Process
Docker Machine provisions a single VirtualBox springmusic VM on which host the project’s containers. VirtualBox provides a quick and easy solution that can be run locally for initial development and testing of the application.

Next, the script creates a Docker data volume and project-specific Docker bridge network.

Next, using the project’s individual Dockerfiles, Docker Compose pulls base Docker images from Docker Hub for NGINX, Tomcat, ELK, and MongoDB. Project-specific immutable Docker images are then built for NGINX, Tomcat, and MongoDB. While constructing the project-specific Docker images for NGINX and Tomcat, the latest Spring Music build artifacts are pulled and installed into the corresponding Docker images.

Docker Compose builds and deploys (6) containers onto the VirtualBox VM: (1) NGINX, (3) Tomcat, (1) MongoDB, and (1) ELK.

The NGINX Dockerfile:

The Tomcat Dockerfile:

Docker Compose v2 YAML
This post was recently updated for Docker 1.12, and to use Docker Compose v2 YAML file format. The post’s docker-compose.yml takes advantage of improvements in Docker 1.12 and Docker Compose v2 YAML. Improvements to the YAML file include eliminating the need to link containers and expose ports, and the addition of named networks and volumes.

The Results

Spring Music Infrastructure

Below are the results of building the project.

Testing the Application

Below are partial results of the curl test, hitting the NGINX endpoint. Note the different IP addresses in the Upstream-Address field between requests. This test proves NGINX’s round-robin load-balancing is working across the three Tomcat application instances: music_app_1, music_app_2, and music_app_3.

Also, note the sharp decrease in the Request-Time between the first three requests and subsequent three requests. The Upstream-Response-Time to the Tomcat instances doesn’t change, yet the total Request-Time is much shorter, due to caching of the application’s static assets by NGINX.

Spring Music Application Links

Assuming the springmusic VM is running at 192.168.99.100, the following links can be used to access various project endpoints. Note the (3) Tomcat instances each map to randomly exposed ports. These ports are not required by NGINX, which maps to port 8080 for each instance. The port is only required if you want access to the Tomcat Web Console. The port, shown below, 32771, is merely used as an example.

* The Tomcat user name is admin and the password is t0mcat53rv3r.

Helpful Links

TODOs

  • Automate the Docker image build and publish processes
  • Automate the Docker container build and deploy processes
  • Automate post-deployment verification testing of project infrastructure
  • Add Docker Swarm multi-host capabilities with overlay networking
  • Update Spring Music with latest CF project revisions
  • Include scripting example to stand-up project on AWS
  • Add Consul and Consul Template for NGINX configuration

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Automate the Provisioning and Configuration of HAProxy and an Apache Web Server Cluster Using Foreman

Use Vagrant, Foreman, and Puppet to provision and configure HAProxy as a reverse proxy, load-balancer for a cluster of Apache web servers.

Simple Load Balanced 2

Introduction

In this post, we will use several technologies, including VagrantForeman, and Puppet, to provision and configure a basic load-balanced web server environment. In this environment, a single node with HAProxy will act as a reverse proxy and load-balancer for two identical Apache web server nodes. All three nodes will be provisioned and bootstrapped using Vagrant, from a Linux CentOS 6.5 Vagrant Box. Afterwards, Foreman, with Puppet, will then be used to install and configure the nodes with HAProxy and Apache, using a series of Puppet modules.

For this post, I will assume you already have running instances of Vagrant with the vagrant-hostmanager plugin, VirtualBox, and Foreman. If you are unfamiliar with Vagrant, the vagrant-hostmanager plugin, VirtualBox, Foreman, or Puppet, review my recent post, Installing Foreman and Puppet Agent on Multiple VMs Using Vagrant and VirtualBox. This post demonstrates how to install and configure Foreman. In addition, the post also demonstrates how to provision and bootstrap virtual machines using Vagrant and VirtualBox. Basically, we will be repeating many of this same steps in this post, with the addition of HAProxy, Apache, and some custom configuration Puppet modules.

All code for this post is available on GitHub. However, it been updated as of 8/23/2015. Changes were required to fix compatibility issues with the latest versions of Puppet 4.x and Foreman. Additionally, the version of CentOS on all VMs was updated from 6.6 to 7.1 and the version of Foreman was updated from 1.7 to 1.9.

Steps

Here is a high-level overview of our steps in this post:

  1. Provision and configure the three CentOS-based virtual machines (‘nodes’) using Vagrant and VirtualBox
  2. Install the HAProxy and Apache Puppet modules, from Puppet Forge, onto the Foreman server
  3. Install the custom HAProxy and Apache Puppet configuration modules, from GitHub, onto the Foreman server
  4. Import the four new module’s classes to Foreman’s Puppet class library
  5. Add the three new virtual machines (‘hosts’) to Foreman
  6. Configure the new hosts in Foreman, assigning the appropriate Puppet classes
  7. Apply the Foreman Puppet configurations to the new hosts
  8. Test HAProxy is working as a reverse and proxy load-balancer for the two Apache web server nodes

In this post, I will use the terms ‘virtual machine’, ‘machine’, ‘node’, ‘agent node’, and ‘host’, interchangeable, based on each software’s own nomenclature.

Provisioning

First, using the process described in the previous post, provision and bootstrap the three new virtual machines. The new machine’s Vagrant configuration is shown below. This should be added to the JSON configuration file. All code for the earlier post is available on GitHub.

{
  "nodes": {
    "haproxy.example.com": {
      ":ip": "192.168.35.101",
      "ports": [],
      ":memory": 512,
      ":bootstrap": "bootstrap-node.sh"
    },
    "node01.example.com": {
      ":ip": "192.168.35.121",
      "ports": [],
      ":memory": 512,
      ":bootstrap": "bootstrap-node.sh"
    },
    "node02.example.com": {
      ":ip": "192.168.35.122",
      "ports": [],
      ":memory": 512,
      ":bootstrap": "bootstrap-node.sh"
    }
  }
}

After provisioning and bootstrapping, observe the three machines running in Oracle’s VM VirtualBox Manager.

Oracle VM VirtualBox Manager View of New Nodes

Oracle VM VirtualBox Manager View of New Nodes

Installing Puppet Forge Modules

The next task is to install the HAProxy and Apache Puppet modules on the Foreman server. This allows Foreman to have access to them. I chose the puppetlabs-haproxy HAProxy module and the puppetlabs-apache Apache modules. Both modules were authored by Puppet Labs, and are available on Puppet Forge.

The exact commands to install the modules onto your Foreman server will depend on your Foreman environment configuration. In my case, I used the following two commands to install the two Puppet Forge modules into my ‘Production’ environment’s module directory.

sudo puppet module install -i /etc/puppet/environments/production/modules puppetlabs-haproxy
sudo puppet module install -i /etc/puppet/environments/production/modules puppetlabs-apache

# confirm module installation
puppet module list --modulepath /etc/puppet/environments/production/modules

Installing Configuration Modules

Next, install the HAProxy and Apache configuration Puppet modules on the Foreman server. Both modules are hosted on my GitHub repository. Both modules can be downloaded directly from GitHub and installed on the Foreman server, from the command line. Again, the exact commands to install the modules onto your Foreman server will depend on your Foreman environment configuration. In my case, I used the following two commands to install the two Puppet Forge modules into my ‘Production’ environment’s module directory. Also, notice I am currently downloading version 0.1.0 of both modules at the time of writing this post. Make sure to double-check for the latest versions of both modules before running the commands. Modify the commands if necessary.

# apache config module
wget -N https://github.com/garystafford/garystafford-apache_example_config/archive/v0.1.0.tar.gz && \
sudo puppet module install -i /etc/puppet/environments/production/modules ~/v0.1.0.tar.gz --force

# haproxy config module
wget -N https://github.com/garystafford/garystafford-haproxy_node_config/archive/v0.1.0.tar.gz && \
sudo puppet module install -i /etc/puppet/environments/production/modules ~/v0.1.0.tar.gz --force

# confirm module installation
puppet module list --modulepath /etc/puppet/environments/production/modules
GitHub Repository for Apache Config Example

GitHub Repository for Apache Config Example

HAProxy Configuration
The HAProxy configuration module configures HAProxy’s /etc/haproxy/haproxy.cfg file. The single class in the module’s init.pp manifest is as follows:

class haproxy_node_config () inherits haproxy {
  haproxy::listen { 'puppet00':
    collect_exported => false,
    ipaddress        => '*',
    ports            => '80',
    mode             => 'http',
    options          => {
      'option'  => ['httplog'],
      'balance' => 'roundrobin',
    },
  }

  Haproxy::Balancermember <<| listening_service == 'puppet00' |>>

  haproxy::balancermember { 'haproxy':
    listening_service => 'puppet00',
    server_names      => ['node01.example.com', 'node02.example.com'],
    ipaddresses       => ['192.168.35.121', '192.168.35.122'],
    ports             => '80',
    options           => 'check',
  }
}

The resulting /etc/haproxy/haproxy.cfg file will have the following configuration added. It defines the two Apache web server node’s hostname, ip addresses, and http port. The configuration also defines the load-balancing method, ‘round-robin‘ in our example. In this example, we are using layer 7 load-balancing (application layer – http), as opposed to layer 4 load-balancing (transport layer – tcp). Either method will work for this example. The Puppet Labs’ HAProxy module’s documentation on Puppet Forge and HAProxy’s own documentation are both excellent starting points to understand how to configure HAProxy. We are barely scraping the surface of HAProxy’s capabilities in this brief example.

listen puppet00
  bind *:80
  mode  http
  balance  roundrobin
  option  httplog
  server node01.example.com 192.168.35.121:80 check
  server node02.example.com 192.168.35.122:80 check

Apache Configuration
The Apache configuration module creates default web page in Apache’s docroot directory, /var/www/html/index.html. The single class in the module’s init.pp manifest is as follows:
ApacheConfigClass
The resulting /var/www/html/index.html file will look like the following. Observe that the facter variables shown in the module manifest above have been replaced by the individual node’s hostname and ip address during application of the configuration by Puppet (ie. ${fqdn} became node01.example.com).

ApacheConfigClass

Both of these Puppet modules were created specifically to configure HAProxy and Apache for this post. Unlike published modules on Puppet Forge, these two modules are very simple, and don’t necessarily represent the best practices and patterns for authoring Puppet Forge modules.

Importing into Foreman

After installing the new modules onto the Foreman server, we need to import them into Foreman. This is accomplished from the ‘Puppet classes’ tab, using the ‘Import from theforeman.example.com’ button. Once imported, the module classes are available to assign to host machines.

Importing Puppet Classes into Foreman

Importing Puppet Classes into Foreman

Add Host to Foreman

Next, add the three new hosts to Foreman. If you have questions on how to add the nodes to Foreman, start Puppet’s Certificate Signing Request (CSR) process on the hosts, signing the certificates, or other first time tasks, refer to the previous post. That post explains this process in detail.

Foreman Hosts Tab Showing New Nodes

Foreman Hosts Tab Showing New Nodes

Configure the Hosts

Next, configure the HAProxy and Apache nodes with the necessary Puppet classes. In addition to the base module classes and configuration classes, I recommend adding git and ntp modules to each of the new nodes. These modules were explained in the previous post. Refer to the screen-grabs below for correct module classes to add, specific to HAProxy and Apache.

HAProxy Node Puppet Classes Tab

HAProxy Node Puppet Classes Tab

Apache Nodes Puppet Classes Tab

Apache Nodes Puppet Classes Tab

Agent Configuration and Testing the System

Once configurations are retrieved and applied by Puppet Agent on each node, we can test our reverse proxy load-balanced environment. To start, open a browser and load haproxy.paychex.com. You should see one of the two pages below. Refresh the page a few times. You should observe HAProxy re-directing you to one Apache web server node, and then the other, using HAProxy’s round-robin algorithm. You can differentiate the Apache web servers by the hostname and ip address displayed on the web page.

Load Balancer Directing Traffic to Node01

Load Balancer Directing Traffic to Node01

Load Balancer Directing Traffic to Node02

Load Balancer Directing Traffic to Node02

After hitting HAProxy’s URL several times successfully, view HAProxy’s built-in Statistics Report page at http://haproxy.example.com/haproxy?stats. Note below, each of the two Apache node has been hit 44 times each from HAProxy. This demonstrates the effectiveness of the reverse proxy and load-balancing features of HAProxy.

Statistics Report for HAProxy

Statistics Report for HAProxy

Accessing Apache Directly
If you are testing HAProxy from the same machine on which you created the virtual machines (VirtualBox host), you will likely be able to directly access either of the Apache web servers (ei. node02.example.com). The VirtualBox host file contains the ip addresses and hostnames of all three hosts. This DNS configuration was done automatically by the vagrant-hostmanager plugin. However, in an actual Production environment, only the HAProxy server’s hostname and ip address would be publicly accessible to a user. The two Apache nodes would sit behind a firewall, accessible only by the HAProxy server. HAProxy acts as a façade to public side of the network.

Testing Apache Host Failure
The main reason you would likely use a load-balancer is high-availability. With HAProxy acting as a load-balancer, we should be able to impair one of the two Apache nodes, without noticeable disruption. HAProxy will continue to serve content from the remaining Apache web server node.

Log into node01.example.com, using the following command, vagrant ssh node01.example.com. To simulate an impairment on ‘node01’, run the following command to stop Apache, sudo service httpd stop. Now, refresh the haproxy.example.com URL in your web browser. You should notice HAProxy is now redirecting all traffic to node02.example.com.

Troubleshooting

While troubleshooting HAProxy configuration issues for this demonstration, I discovered logging is not configured by default on CentOS. No worries, I recommend HAProxy: Give me some logs on CentOS 6.5!, by Stephane Combaudon, to get logging running. Once logging is active, you can more easily troubleshoot HAProxy and Apache configuration issues. Here are some example commands you might find useful:

# haproxy
sudo more -f /var/log/haproxy.log
sudo haproxy -f /etc/haproxy/haproxy.cfg -c # check/validate config file

# apache
sudo ls -1 /etc/httpd/logs/
sudo tail -50 /etc/httpd/logs/error_log
sudo less /etc/httpd/logs/access_log

Redundant Proxies

In this simple example, the system’s weakest point is obviously the single HAProxy instance. It represents a single-point-of-failure (SPOF) in our environment. In an actual production environment, you would likely have more than one instance of HAProxy. They may both be in a load-balanced pool, or one active and on standby as a failover, should one instance become impaired. There are several techniques for building in proxy redundancy, often with the use of Virtual IP and Keepalived. Below is a list of articles that might help you take this post’s example to the next level.

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Installing Foreman and Puppet Agent on Multiple VMs Using Vagrant and VirtualBox

Automatically install and configure Foreman, the open source infrastructure lifecycle management tool, and multiple Puppet Agent VMs using Vagrant and VirtualBox.

Foreman - Overview

Introduction

In the last post, Installing Puppet Master and Agents on Multiple VM Using Vagrant and VirtualBox, we installed Puppet Master/Agent on VirtualBox VMs using Vagrant. Puppet Master is an excellent tool, but lacks the ease-of-use of Puppet Enterprise or Foreman. In this post, we will build an almost identical environment, substituting Foreman for Puppet Master.

According to Foreman’s website, “Foreman is an open source project that helps system administrators manage servers throughout their lifecycle, from provisioning and configuration to orchestration and monitoring. Using Puppet or Chef and Foreman’s smart proxy architecture, you can easily automate repetitive tasks, quickly deploy applications, and proactively manage change, both on-premise with VMs and bare-metal or in the cloud.

Combined with Puppet Labs’ Open Source Puppet, Foreman is an effective solution to manage infrastructure and system configuration. Again, according to Foreman’s website, the Foreman installer is a collection of Puppet modules that installs everything required for a full working Foreman setup. The installer uses native OS packaging and adds necessary configuration for the complete installation. By default, the Foreman installer will configure:

  • Apache HTTP with SSL (using a Puppet-signed certificate)
  • Foreman running under mod_passenger
  • Smart Proxy configured for Puppet, TFTP and SSL
  • Puppet master running under mod_passenger
  • Puppet agent configured
  • TFTP server (under xinetd on Red Hat platforms)

For the average Systems Engineer or Software Developer, installing and configuring Foreman, Puppet Master, Apache, Puppet Agent, and the other associated software packages listed above, is daunting. If the installation doesn’t work properly, you must troubleshooting, or trying to remove and reinstall some or all the components.

A better solution is to automate the installation of Foreman into a Docker container, or on to a VM using Vagrant. Automating the installation process guarantees accuracy and consistency. The Vagrant VirtualBox VM can be snapshotted, moved to another host, or simply destroyed and recreated, if needed.

All code for this post is available on GitHub. However, it been updated as of 8/23/2015. Changes were required to fix compatibility issues with the latest versions of Puppet 4.x and Foreman. Additionally, the version of CentOS on all VMs was updated from 6.6 to 7.1 and the version of Foreman was updated from 1.7 to 1.9.

The Post’s Example

In this post, we will use Vagrant and VirtualBox to create three VMs. The VMs in this post will be build from a standard CentOS 6.5 x64 base Vagrant Box, located on Atlas. We will use a single JSON-format configuration file to automatically build all three VMs with Vagrant. As part of the provisioning process, using Vagrant’s shell provisioner, we will execute a bootstrap shell script. The script will install Foreman and it’s associated software on the first VM, and Puppet Agent on the two remaining VMs (aka Puppet ‘agent nodes’ or Foreman ‘hosts’).

Foreman does have the ability to provision on bare-metal infrastructure and public or private clouds. However, this example would simulate an environment where you have existing nodes you want to manage with Foreman.

The Foreman bootstrap script will also download several Puppet modules. To test Foreman once the provisioning is complete, import those module’s classes into Foreman and assign the classes to the hosts. The hosts will fetch and apply the configurations. You can then test for the installed instances of those module’s components on the puppet agent hosts.

Vagrant

To begin the process, we will use the JSON-format configuration file to create the three VMs, using Vagrant and VirtualBox.

{
  "nodes": {
    "theforeman.example.com": {
      ":ip": "192.168.35.5",
      "ports": [],
      ":memory": 1024,
      ":bootstrap": "bootstrap-foreman.sh"
    },
    "agent01.example.com": {
      ":ip": "192.168.35.10",
      "ports": [],
      ":memory": 1024,
      ":bootstrap": "bootstrap-node.sh"
    },
    "agent02.example.com": {
      ":ip": "192.168.35.20",
      "ports": [],
      ":memory": 1024,
      ":bootstrap": "bootstrap-node.sh"
    }
  }
}

The Vagrantfile uses the JSON-format configuration file, to provision the three VMs, using a single ‘vagrant up‘ command. That’s it, less than 30 lines of actual code in the Vagrantfile to create as many VMs as you want. For this post’s example, we will not need to add any VirtualBox port mappings. However, that can also done from the JSON configuration file (see the READM.md for more directions).

 

Vagrant Provisioning the VMs

Vagrant Provisioning the VMs

If you have not used the CentOS Vagrant Box, it will take a few minutes the first time for Vagrant to download the it to the local Vagrant Box repository.

# -*- mode: ruby -*-
# vi: set ft=ruby :

# Builds single Foreman server and
# multiple Puppet Agent Nodes using JSON config file
# Gary A. Stafford - 01/15/2015

# read vm and chef configurations from JSON files
nodes_config = (JSON.parse(File.read("nodes.json")))['nodes']

VAGRANTFILE_API_VERSION = "2"

Vagrant.configure(VAGRANTFILE_API_VERSION) do |config|
  config.vm.box = "chef/centos-6.5"

  nodes_config.each do |node|
    node_name   = node[0] # name of node
    node_values = node[1] # content of node

    config.vm.define node_name do |config|
      # configures all forwarding ports in JSON array
      ports = node_values['ports']
      ports.each do |port|
        config.vm.network :forwarded_port,
          host:  port[':host'],
          guest: port[':guest'],
          id:    port[':id']
      end

      config.vm.hostname = node_name
      config.vm.network :private_network, ip: node_values[':ip']

      config.vm.provider :virtualbox do |vb|
        vb.customize ["modifyvm", :id, "--memory", node_values[':memory']]
        vb.customize ["modifyvm", :id, "--name", node_name]
      end

      config.vm.provision :shell, :path => node_values[':bootstrap']
    end
  end
end

Once provisioned, the three VMs, also called ‘Machines’ by Vagrant, should appear in Oracle VM VirtualBox Manager.

Oracle VM VirtualBox Manager View

Oracle VM VirtualBox Manager View

The name of the VMs, referenced in Vagrant commands, is the parent node name in the JSON configuration file (node_name), such as, ‘vagrant ssh theforeman.example.com‘.

Vagrant Status

Bootstrapping Foreman

As part of the Vagrant provisioning process (‘vagrant up‘ command), a bootstrap script is executed on the VMs (shown below). This script will do almost of the installation and configuration work. Below is script for bootstrapping the Foreman VM.

#!/bin/sh

# Run on VM to bootstrap Foreman server
# Gary A. Stafford - 01/15/2015

if ps aux | grep "/usr/share/foreman" | grep -v grep 2> /dev/null
then
    echo "Foreman appears to all already be installed. Exiting..."
else
    # Configure /etc/hosts file
    echo "" | sudo tee --append /etc/hosts 2> /dev/null && \
    echo "192.168.35.5    theforeman.example.com   theforeman" | sudo tee --append /etc/hosts 2> /dev/null

    # Update system first
    sudo yum update -y

    # Install Foreman for CentOS 6
    sudo rpm -ivh http://yum.puppetlabs.com/puppetlabs-release-el-6.noarch.rpm && \
    sudo yum -y install epel-release http://yum.theforeman.org/releases/1.7/el6/x86_64/foreman-release.rpm && \
    sudo yum -y install foreman-installer && \
    sudo foreman-installer

    # First run the Puppet agent on the Foreman host which will send the first Puppet report to Foreman,
    # automatically creating the host in Foreman's database
    sudo puppet agent --test --waitforcert=60

    # Install some optional puppet modules on Foreman server to get started...
    sudo puppet module install -i /etc/puppet/environments/production/modules puppetlabs-ntp
    sudo puppet module install -i /etc/puppet/environments/production/modules puppetlabs-git
    sudo puppet module install -i /etc/puppet/environments/production/modules puppetlabs-docker
fi

Bootstrapping Puppet Agent Nodes

Below is script for bootstrapping the puppet agent nodes. The agent node bootstrap script was executed as part of the Vagrant provisioning process.

#!/bin/sh

# Run on VM to bootstrap Puppet Agent nodes
# Gary A. Stafford - 01/15/2015

if ps aux | grep "puppet agent" | grep -v grep 2> /dev/null
then
    echo "Puppet Agent is already installed. Moving on..."
else
    # Update system first
    sudo yum update -y

    # Install Puppet for CentOS 6
    sudo rpm -ivh http://yum.puppetlabs.com/puppetlabs-release-el-6.noarch.rpm && \
    sudo yum -y install puppet

    # Configure /etc/hosts file
    echo "" | sudo tee --append /etc/hosts 2> /dev/null && \
    echo "192.168.35.5    theforeman.example.com   theforeman" | sudo tee --append /etc/hosts 2> /dev/null

    # Add agent section to /etc/puppet/puppet.conf (sets run interval to 120 seconds)
    echo "" | sudo tee --append /etc/puppet/puppet.conf 2> /dev/null && \
    echo "    server = theforeman.example.com" | sudo tee --append /etc/puppet/puppet.conf 2> /dev/null && \
    echo "    runinterval = 120" | sudo tee --append /etc/puppet/puppet.conf 2> /dev/null

    sudo service puppet stop
    sudo service puppet start

    sudo puppet resource service puppet ensure=running enable=true
    sudo puppet agent --enable
fi

Now that the Foreman is running, use the command, ‘vagrant ssh agent01.example.com‘, to ssh into the first puppet agent node. Run the command below.

sudo puppet agent --test --waitforcert=60

The command above manually starts Puppet’s Certificate Signing Request (CSR) process, to generate the certificates and security credentials (private and public keys) generated by Puppet’s built-in certificate authority (CA). Each puppet agent node must have it certificate signed by the Foreman, first. According to Puppet’s website, “Before puppet agent nodes can retrieve their configuration catalogs, they need a signed certificate from the local Puppet certificate authority (CA). When using Puppet’s built-in CA (that is, not using an external CA), agents will submit a certificate signing request (CSR) to the CA Puppet Master (Foreman) and will retrieve a signed certificate once one is available.

Waiting for Certificate to be Signed by Foreman

Waiting for Certificate to be Signed by Foreman

Open the Foreman browser-based interface, running at https://theforeman.example.com. Proceed to the ‘Infrastructure’ -> ‘Smart Proxies’ tab. Sign the certificate(s) from the agent nodes (shown below). The agent node will wait for the Foreman to sign the certificate, before continuing with the initial configuration.

Certificate Waiting to be Signed in Foreman

Certificate Waiting to be Signed in Foreman

Once the certificate signing process is complete, the host retrieves the client configuration from the Foreman and applies it to the hosts.

Foreman Puppet Configuration Applied to Agent Node

Foreman Puppet Configuration Applied to Agent Node

That’s it, you should now have one host running Foreman and two puppet agent nodes.

Testing Foreman

To test Foreman, import the classes from the Puppet modules installed with the Foreman bootstrap script.

Foreman - Puppet Classes

Foreman – Puppet Classes

Next, apply  ntp, git, and Docker classes to both agent nodes (aka, Foreman ‘hosts’), as well as the Foreman node, itself.

Foreman - Agents Puppet Classes

Foreman – Agents Puppet Classes

Every two minutes, the two agent node hosts should fetch their latest configuration from Foreman and apply it. In a few minutes, check the times reported in the ‘Last report’ column on the ‘All Hosts’ tab. If the times are two minutes or less, Foreman and Puppet Agent are working. Note we changed the runinterval to 120 seconds (‘120s’) in the bootstrap script to speed up the Puppet Agent updates for the sake of the demo. The normal default interval is 30 minutes. I recommend changing the agent node’s runinterval back to 30 minutes (’30m’) on the hosts, once everything is working to save unnecessary use of resources.

Foreman - Hosts Reporting Back

Foreman – Hosts Reporting Back

Finally, to verify that the configuration was successfully applied to the hosts, check if ntp, git, and Docker are now running on the hosts.

Agent Node with ntp and git Now Installed

Agent Node with ntp and git Now Installed

Helpful Links

All the source code this project is on Github.

Foreman:
http://theforeman.org

Atlas – Discover Vagrant Boxes:
https://atlas.hashicorp.com/boxes/search

Learning Puppet – Basic Agent/Master Puppet
https://docs.puppetlabs.com/learning/agent_master_basic.html

Puppet Glossary (of terms):
https://docs.puppetlabs.com/references/glossary.html

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Installing Puppet Master and Agents on Multiple VM Using Vagrant and VirtualBox

 Automatically provision multiple VMs with Vagrant and VirtualBox. Automatically install, configure, and test Puppet Master and Puppet Agents on those VMs.

Puppet Master Agent Vagrant (3)

Introduction

Note this post and accompanying source code was updated on 12/16/2014 to v0.2.1. It contains several improvements to improve and simplify the install process.

Puppet Labs’ Open Source Puppet Agent/Master architecture is an effective solution to manage infrastructure and system configuration. However, for the average System Engineer or Software Developer, installing and configuring Puppet Master and Puppet Agent can be challenging. If the installation doesn’t work properly, the engineer’s stuck troubleshooting, or trying to remove and re-install Puppet.

A better solution, automate the installation of Puppet Master and Puppet Agent on Virtual Machines (VMs). Automating the installation process guarantees accuracy and consistency. Installing Puppet on VMs means the VMs can be snapshotted, cloned, or simply destroyed and recreated, if needed.

In this post, we will use Vagrant and VirtualBox to create three VMs. The VMs will be build from a  Ubuntu 14.04.1 LTS (Trusty Tahr) Vagrant Box, previously on Vagrant Cloud, now on Atlas. We will use a single JSON-format configuration file to build all three VMs, automatically. As part of the Vagrant provisioning process, we will run a bootstrap shell script to install Puppet Master on the first VM (Puppet Master server) and Puppet Agent on the two remaining VMs (agent nodes).

Lastly, to test our Puppet installations, we will use Puppet to install some basic Puppet modules, including ntp and git on the server, and ntpgitDocker and Fig, on the agent nodes.

All the source code this project is on Github.

Vagrant

To begin the process, we will use the JSON-format configuration file to create the three VMs, using Vagrant and VirtualBox.

{
  "nodes": {
    "puppet.example.com": {
      ":ip": "192.168.32.5",
      "ports": [],
      ":memory": 1024,
      ":bootstrap": "bootstrap-master.sh"
    },
    "node01.example.com": {
      ":ip": "192.168.32.10",
      "ports": [],
      ":memory": 1024,
      ":bootstrap": "bootstrap-node.sh"
    },
    "node02.example.com": {
      ":ip": "192.168.32.20",
      "ports": [],
      ":memory": 1024,
      ":bootstrap": "bootstrap-node.sh"
    }
  }
}

The Vagrantfile uses the JSON-format configuration file, to provision the three VMs, using a single ‘vagrant up‘ command. That’s it, less than 30 lines of actual code in the Vagrantfile to create as many VMs as we need. For this post’s example, we will not need to add any port mappings, which can be done from the JSON configuration file (see the READM.md for more directions). The Vagrant Box we are using already has the correct ports opened.

If you have not previously used the Ubuntu Vagrant Box, it will take a few minutes the first time for Vagrant to download the it to the local Vagrant Box repository.

# vi: set ft=ruby :

# Builds Puppet Master and multiple Puppet Agent Nodes using JSON config file
# Author: Gary A. Stafford

# read vm and chef configurations from JSON files
nodes_config = (JSON.parse(File.read("nodes.json")))['nodes']

VAGRANTFILE_API_VERSION = "2"

Vagrant.configure(VAGRANTFILE_API_VERSION) do |config|
  config.vm.box = "ubuntu/trusty64"

  nodes_config.each do |node|
    node_name   = node[0] # name of node
    node_values = node[1] # content of node

    config.vm.define node_name do |config|
      # configures all forwarding ports in JSON array
      ports = node_values['ports']
      ports.each do |port|
        config.vm.network :forwarded_port,
          host:  port[':host'],
          guest: port[':guest'],
          id:    port[':id']
      end

      config.vm.hostname = node_name
      config.vm.network :private_network, ip: node_values[':ip']

      config.vm.provider :virtualbox do |vb|
        vb.customize ["modifyvm", :id, "--memory", node_values[':memory']]
        vb.customize ["modifyvm", :id, "--name", node_name]
      end

      config.vm.provision :shell, :path => node_values[':bootstrap']
    end
  end
end

Once provisioned, the three VMs, also referred to as ‘Machines’ by Vagrant, should appear, as shown below, in Oracle VM VirtualBox Manager.

Vagrant Machines in VM VirtualBox Manager

Vagrant Machines in VM VirtualBox Manager

The name of the VMs, referenced in Vagrant commands, is the parent node name in the JSON configuration file (node_name), such as, ‘vagrant ssh puppet.example.com‘.

Vagrant Machine Names

Vagrant Machine Names

Bootstrapping Puppet Master Server

As part of the Vagrant provisioning process, a bootstrap script is executed on each of the VMs (script shown below). This script will do 98% of the required work for us. There is one for the Puppet Master server VM, and one for each agent node.

#!/bin/sh

# Run on VM to bootstrap Puppet Master server

if ps aux | grep "puppet master" | grep -v grep 2> /dev/null
then
    echo "Puppet Master is already installed. Exiting..."
else
    # Install Puppet Master
    wget https://apt.puppetlabs.com/puppetlabs-release-trusty.deb && \
    sudo dpkg -i puppetlabs-release-trusty.deb && \
    sudo apt-get update -yq && sudo apt-get upgrade -yq && \
    sudo apt-get install -yq puppetmaster

    # Configure /etc/hosts file
    echo "" | sudo tee --append /etc/hosts 2> /dev/null && \
    echo "# Host config for Puppet Master and Agent Nodes" | sudo tee --append /etc/hosts 2> /dev/null && \
    echo "192.168.32.5    puppet.example.com  puppet" | sudo tee --append /etc/hosts 2> /dev/null && \
    echo "192.168.32.10   node01.example.com  node01" | sudo tee --append /etc/hosts 2> /dev/null && \
    echo "192.168.32.20   node02.example.com  node02" | sudo tee --append /etc/hosts 2> /dev/null

    # Add optional alternate DNS names to /etc/puppet/puppet.conf
    sudo sed -i 's/.*\[main\].*/&\ndns_alt_names = puppet,puppet.example.com/' /etc/puppet/puppet.conf

    # Install some initial puppet modules on Puppet Master server
    sudo puppet module install puppetlabs-ntp
    sudo puppet module install garethr-docker
    sudo puppet module install puppetlabs-git
    sudo puppet module install puppetlabs-vcsrepo
    sudo puppet module install garystafford-fig

    # symlink manifest from Vagrant synced folder location
    ln -s /vagrant/site.pp /etc/puppet/manifests/site.pp
fi

There are a few last commands we need to run ourselves, from within the VMs. Once the provisioning process is complete,  ‘vagrant ssh puppet.example.com‘ into the newly provisioned Puppet Master server. Below are the commands we need to run within the ‘puppet.example.com‘ VM.

sudo service puppetmaster status # test that puppet master was installed
sudo service puppetmaster stop
sudo puppet master --verbose --no-daemonize
# Ctrl+C to kill puppet master
sudo service puppetmaster start
sudo puppet cert list --all # check for 'puppet' cert

According to Puppet’s website, ‘these steps will create the CA certificate and the puppet master certificate, with the appropriate DNS names included.

Bootstrapping Puppet Agent Nodes

Now that the Puppet Master server is running, open a second terminal tab (‘Shift+Ctrl+T‘). Use the command, ‘vagrant ssh node01.example.com‘, to ssh into the new Puppet Agent node. The agent node bootstrap script should have already executed as part of the Vagrant provisioning process.

#!/bin/sh

# Run on VM to bootstrap Puppet Agent nodes
# http://blog.kloudless.com/2013/07/01/automating-development-environments-with-vagrant-and-puppet/

if ps aux | grep "puppet agent" | grep -v grep 2> /dev/null
then
    echo "Puppet Agent is already installed. Moving on..."
else
    sudo apt-get install -yq puppet
fi

if cat /etc/crontab | grep puppet 2> /dev/null
then
    echo "Puppet Agent is already configured. Exiting..."
else
    sudo apt-get update -yq && sudo apt-get upgrade -yq

    sudo puppet resource cron puppet-agent ensure=present user=root minute=30 \
        command='/usr/bin/puppet agent --onetime --no-daemonize --splay'

    sudo puppet resource service puppet ensure=running enable=true

    # Configure /etc/hosts file
    echo "" | sudo tee --append /etc/hosts 2> /dev/null && \
    echo "# Host config for Puppet Master and Agent Nodes" | sudo tee --append /etc/hosts 2> /dev/null && \
    echo "192.168.32.5    puppet.example.com  puppet" | sudo tee --append /etc/hosts 2> /dev/null && \
    echo "192.168.32.10   node01.example.com  node01" | sudo tee --append /etc/hosts 2> /dev/null && \
    echo "192.168.32.20   node02.example.com  node02" | sudo tee --append /etc/hosts 2> /dev/null

    # Add agent section to /etc/puppet/puppet.conf
    echo "" && echo "[agent]\nserver=puppet" | sudo tee --append /etc/puppet/puppet.conf 2> /dev/null

    sudo puppet agent --enable
fi

Run the two commands below within both the ‘node01.example.com‘ and ‘node02.example.com‘ agent nodes.

sudo service puppet status # test that agent was installed
sudo puppet agent --test --waitforcert=60 # initiate certificate signing request (CSR)

The second command above will manually start Puppet’s Certificate Signing Request (CSR) process, to generate the certificates and security credentials (private and public keys) generated by Puppet’s built-in certificate authority (CA). Each Puppet Agent node must have it certificate signed by the Puppet Master, first. According to Puppet’s website, “Before puppet agent nodes can retrieve their configuration catalogs, they need a signed certificate from the local Puppet certificate authority (CA). When using Puppet’s built-in CA (that is, not using an external CA), agents will submit a certificate signing request (CSR) to the CA Puppet Master and will retrieve a signed certificate once one is available.

Agent Node Starting Puppet's Certificate Signing Request (CSR) Process

Agent Node Starting Puppet’s Certificate Signing Request (CSR) Process

Back on the Puppet Master Server, run the following commands to sign the certificate(s) from the agent node(s). You may sign each node’s certificate individually, or wait and sign them all at once. Note the agent node(s) will wait for the Puppet Master to sign the certificate, before continuing with the Puppet Agent configuration run.

sudo puppet cert list # should see 'node01.example.com' cert waiting for signature
sudo puppet cert sign --all # sign the agent node certs
sudo puppet cert list --all # check for signed certs
Puppet Master Completing Puppet's Certificate Signing Request (CSR) Process

Puppet Master Completing Puppet’s Certificate Signing Request (CSR) Process

Once the certificate signing process is complete, the Puppet Agent retrieves the client configuration from the Puppet Master and applies it to the local agent node. The Puppet Agent will execute all applicable steps in the site.pp manifest on the Puppet Master server, designated for that specific Puppet Agent node (ie.’node node02.example.com {...}‘).

Configuration Run Completed on Puppet Agent Node

Configuration Run Completed on Puppet Agent Node

Below is the main site.pp manifest on the Puppet Master server, applied by Puppet Agent on the agent nodes.

node default {
# Test message
  notify { "Debug output on ${hostname} node.": }

  include ntp, git
}

node 'node01.example.com', 'node02.example.com' {
# Test message
  notify { "Debug output on ${hostname} node.": }

  include ntp, git, docker, fig
}

That’s it! You should now have one server VM running Puppet Master, and two agent node VMs running Puppet Agent. Both agent nodes should have successfully been registered with Puppet Master, and configured themselves based on the Puppet Master’s main manifest. Agent node configuration includes installing ntp, git, Fig, and Docker.

Helpful Links

All the source code this project is on Github.

Puppet Glossary (of terms):
https://docs.puppetlabs.com/references/glossary.html

Puppet Labs Open Source Automation Tools:
http://puppetlabs.com/misc/download-options

Puppet Master Overview:
http://ci.openstack.org/puppet.html

Install Puppet on Ubuntu:
https://docs.puppetlabs.com/guides/install_puppet/install_debian_ubuntu.html

Installing Puppet Master:
http://andyhan.linuxdict.com/index.php/sys-adm/item/273-puppet-371-on-centos-65-quick-start-i

Regenerating Node Certificates:
https://docs.puppetlabs.com/puppet/latest/reference/ssl_regenerate_certificates.html

Automating Development Environments with Vagrant and Puppet:
http://blog.kloudless.com/2013/07/01/automating-development-environments-with-vagrant-and-puppet

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8 Comments

Create Multi-VM Environments Using Vagrant, Chef, and JSON

Create and manage ‘multi-machine’ environments with Vagrant, using JSON configuration files. Allow increased portability across hosts, environments, and organizations. 

Diagram of VM Architecture3

Introduction

As their website says, Vagrant has made it very easy to ‘create and configure lightweight, reproducible, and portable development environments.’ Based on Ruby, the elegantly simple open-source programming language, Vagrant requires a minimal learning curve to get up and running.

In this post, we will create what Vagrant refers to as a ‘multi-machine’ environment. We will provision three virtual machines (VMs). The VMs will mirror a typical three-tier architected environment, with separate web, application, and database servers.

We will move all the VM-specific information from the Vagrantfile to a separate JSON format configuration file. There are a few advantages to moving the configuration information to separate file. First, we can configure any number VMs, while keeping the Vagrantfile exactly the same. Secondly and more importantly, we can re-use the same Vagrantfile to build different VMs on another host machine.

Although certainly not required, I am also using Chef in this example. More specifically, I am using Hosted Chef to further configure the VMs. Like the VM-specific information above, I have also moved the Chef-specific information to a separate JSON configuration file. We can now use the same Vagrantfile within another Chef Environment, or even within another Chef Organization, using an alternate configuration files. If you are not a Chef user, you can disregard that part of the configuration code. Alternately, you can substitute the Chef configuration code for Puppet, if that is your configuration automation tool of choice.

The only items we will not remove from the Vagrantfile are the Vagrant Box and synced folder configurations. These items could also be moved to a separate configuration file, making the Vagrantfile even more generic and portable.

The Code

Below is the VM-specific JSON configuration file, containing all the individual configuration information necessary for Vagrant to build the three VMs: ‘apps’, dbs’, and ‘web’. Each child ‘node’ in the parent ‘nodes’ object contains key/value pairs for VM names, IP addresses, forwarding ports, host names, and memory settings. To add another VM, you would simply add another ‘node’ object.

Next, is the Chef-specific JSON configuration file, containing Chef configuration information common to all the VMs.

Lastly, the Vagrantfile, which loads both configuration files. The Vagrantfile instructs Vagrant to loop through all nodes in the nodes.json file, provisioning VMs for each node. Vagrant then uses the chef.json file to further configure the VMs.

The environment and node configuration items in the chef.json reference an actual Chef Environment and Chef Nodes. They are both part of a Chef Organization, which is configured within a Hosted Chef account.

Each VM has a varying number of ports it needs to configue and forward. To accomplish this, the Vagrantfile not only loops through the each node, it also loops through each port configuration object it finds within the node object. Shown below is the Database Server VM within VirtualBox, containing three forwarding ports.

VirtualBox Port Forwarding Rules

VirtualBox Port Forwarding Rules

In addition to the gists above, this repository on GitHub contains a complete copy of all the code used in the post.

The Results

Running the ‘vagrant up’ command will provision all three individually configured VMs. Once created and running in VirtualBox, Chef further configures the VMs with the necessary settings and applications specific to each server’s purposes. You can just as easily create 10, 100, or 1,000 VMs using this same process.

VirtualBox View of Multiple Virtual Machines

VirtualBox View of Multiple Virtual Machines

.

Virtual Media Manager View of VMs

Virtual Media Manager View of VMs

Helpful Links

  • Dustin Collins’ ‘Multi-VM Vagrant the DRY way’ Blog Post (link)
  • Red Badger’s ‘Automating your Infrastructure with Vagrant & Chef – From Development to the Cloud’ Blog Post (link)
  • David Lutz’s Multi-Machine Vagrantfile GitHub Gist (link)
  • Kevin Jackson’s Multi-Machine Vagrantfile GitHub Gist (link)

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4 Comments

Dynamically Allocated Storage Issues with Ubuntu’s Cloud Images

Imagine you’ve provisioned dozens of nodes on your network using Ubuntu’s Cloud Images, expecting them to grow dynamically…

Background

According to Canonical, ‘Ubuntu Cloud Images are pre-installed disk images that have been customized by Ubuntu engineering to run on cloud-platforms such as Amazon EC2, Openstack, Windows and LXC’. Ubuntu also disk images, or ‘boxes’, built specifically for Vagrant and VirtualBox. Boxes, according to Vagrant, ‘are the skeleton from which Vagrant machines are constructed. They are portable files which can be used by others on any platform that runs Vagrant to bring up a working environment‘. Ubuntu’s images are very popular with Vagrant users to build their VMs.

Assuming you have VirtualBox and Vagrant installed on your Windows, Mac OS X, or Linux system, with a few simple commands, ‘vagrant add box…’, ‘vagrant init…’, and ‘vagrant up’, you can provision a VM from one of these boxes.

Dynamically Allocated Storage

The Ubuntu Cloud Images (boxes), are Virtual Machine Disk (VMDK) format files. These VMDK files are configured for dynamically allocated storage, with a virtual size of 40 GB. That means the VMDK format file should grow to an actual size of 40 GB, as files are added. According to VirtualBox, the VM ‘will initially be very small and not occupy any space for unused virtual disk sectors, but will grow every time a disk sector is written to for the first time, until the drive reaches the maximum capacity chosen when the drive was created’.

To illustrate dynamically allocated storage, below are three freshly provisioned VirtualBox virtual machines (VM), on three different hosts, all with different operating systems. One VM is hosted on Windows 7 Enterprise, another on Ubuntu 13.10 Desktop Edition, and the last on Mac OS X 10.6.8. The VMs were all created with Vagrant from the official Ubuntu Server 13.10 (Saucy Salamander)  cloud images. The Windows and Ubuntu hosts used the 64-bit version. The Mac OS X host used the 32-bit version. According to VirtualBox Manager, on all three host platforms, the virtual size of the VMs is 40 GB and the actual size is about 1 GB.

VirtualBox Storage Settings on Windows Host

VirtualBox Storage Settings on Windows Host

VirtualBox Storage Settings on Ubuntu Host

VirtualBox Storage Settings on Ubuntu Host

VirtualBox Storage Settings on Mac OS X Host

VirtualBox Storage Settings on Mac OS X Host

So What’s the Problem?

After a significant amount of troubleshooting Chef recipe problems on two different Ubuntu-hosted VMs, the issue with the cloud images became painfully clear. Other than a single (seemingly charmed) Windows host, none of the VMs I tested on Windows-, Ubuntu-, and Mac OS X-hosts would expand beyond 4 GB. Below is the file system disk space usage report from four host’s VMs. All four were created with the most current version of Vagrant (1.4.1), and managed with the most current version of VirtualBox (4.3.6.x).

Windows-hosted 64-bit Cloud Image VM #1:

vagrant@vagrant-ubuntu-saucy-64:/tmp$ df -hT
Filesystem     Type      Size  Used Avail Use% Mounted on
/dev/sda1      ext4       40G  1.1G   37G   3% /
none           tmpfs     4.0K     0  4.0K   0% /sys/fs/cgroup
udev           devtmpfs  241M   12K  241M   1% /dev
tmpfs          tmpfs      50M  336K   49M   1% /run
none           tmpfs     5.0M     0  5.0M   0% /run/lock
none           tmpfs     246M     0  246M   0% /run/shm
none           tmpfs     100M     0  100M   0% /run/user
/vagrant       vboxsf    233G  196G   38G  85% /vagrant

Windows-hosted 32-bit Cloud Image VM #2:

vagrant@vagrant-ubuntu-saucy-32:~$ df -hT
Filesystem     Type      Size  Used Avail Use% Mounted on
/dev/sda1      ext4      4.0G 1012M  2.8G  27% /
none           tmpfs     4.0K     0  4.0K   0% /sys/fs/cgroup
udev           devtmpfs  245M  8.0K  245M   1% /dev
tmpfs          tmpfs      50M  336K   50M   1% /run
none           tmpfs     5.0M  4.0K  5.0M   1% /run/lock
none           tmpfs     248M     0  248M   0% /run/shm
none           tmpfs     100M     0  100M   0% /run/user
/vagrant       vboxsf    932G  209G  724G  23% /vagrant

Ubuntu-hosted 64-bit Cloud Image VM:

vagrant@vagrant-ubuntu-saucy-64:~$ df -hT
Filesystem     Type      Size  Used Avail Use% Mounted on
/dev/sda1      ext4      4.0G  1.1G  2.7G  28% /
none           tmpfs     4.0K     0  4.0K   0% /sys/fs/cgroup
udev           devtmpfs  241M  8.0K  241M   1% /dev
tmpfs          tmpfs      50M  336K   49M   1% /run
none           tmpfs     5.0M     0  5.0M   0% /run/lock
none           tmpfs     246M     0  246M   0% /run/shm
none           tmpfs     100M     0  100M   0% /run/user
/vagrant       vboxsf     74G   65G  9.1G  88% /vagrant

Mac OS X-hosted 32-bit Cloud Image VM:

vagrant@vagrant-ubuntu-saucy-32:~$ df -hT
Filesystem     Type      Size  Used Avail Use% Mounted on
/dev/sda1      ext4      4.0G 1012M  2.8G  27% /
none           tmpfs     4.0K     0  4.0K   0% /sys/fs/cgroup
udev           devtmpfs  245M   12K  245M   1% /dev
tmpfs          tmpfs      50M  336K   50M   1% /run
none           tmpfs     5.0M     0  5.0M   0% /run/lock
none           tmpfs     248M     0  248M   0% /run/shm
none           tmpfs     100M     0  100M   0% /run/user
/vagrant       vboxsf    149G   71G   79G  48% /vagrant

On the first Windows-hosted VM (the only host that actually worked), the virtual SCSI disk device (sda1), formatted ‘ext4‘, had a capacity of 40 GB. But, on the other three hosts, the same virtual device only had a capacity of 4 GB. I tested the various 32- and 64-bit Ubuntu Server 12.10 (Quantal Quetzal), 13.04 (Raring Ringtail), and 13.10 (Saucy Salamander) cloud images. They all exhibited the same issue. However, the Ubuntu 12.04.3 LTS (Precise Pangolin) worked fine on all three host OS systems.

To prove the issue was specifically with Ubuntu’s cloud images, I also tested boxes from Vagrant’s own repository, as well as other third-party providers. They all worked as expected, with no storage discrepancies. This was suggested in the only post I found on this issue, from StackExchange.

To confirm the Ubuntu-hosted VM will not expand beyond 4 GB, I also created a few multi-gigabyte files on each VM, totally 4 GB. The VMs virtual drive would not expand beyond 4 GB limit to accommodate the new files, as demonstrated below on a Ubuntu-hosted VM:

vagrant@vagrant-ubuntu-saucy-64:~$ dd if=/dev/zero of=/tmp/big_file2.bin bs=1M count=2000
dd: writing '/tmp/big_file2.bin': No space left on device
742+0 records in
741+0 records out
777560064 bytes (778 MB) copied, 1.81098 s, 429 MB/s

vagrant@vagrant-ubuntu-saucy-64:~$ df -hT
Filesystem     Type      Size  Used Avail Use% Mounted on
/dev/sda1      ext4      4.0G  3.7G  196K 100% /

The exact cause eludes me, but I tend to think the cloud images are the issue. I know they are capable of working, since the Ubuntu 12.04.3 cloud images expand to 40 GB, but the three most recent releases are limited to 4 GB. Whatever the cause, it’s a significant problem. Imagine you’ve provisioned a 100 or a 1,000 server nodes on your network from any of these cloud images, expecting them to grow to 40 GB, but really only having 10% of that potential. Worse, they have live production data on them, and suddenly run out of space.

Test Results

Below is the complete shell sessions from three hosts.

Windows-hosted 64-bit Cloud Image VM #1:

Ubuntu-hosted 64-bit Cloud Image VM:

Mac OS X-hosted 32-bit Cloud Image VM:

Resources

Ubuntu Cloud Images for Vagrant

Fourth Extended Filesystem (ext4)

Similar Issue on StackOverflow

VBoxManage Command-Line Interface

Ubuntu Releases

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Updating Ubuntu Linux to the Latest JDK

Introduction

If you are Java Developer, new to the Linux environment, installing and configuring Java updates can be a bit daunting. In the following post, we will update a VirtualBox VM running Canonical’s popular Ubuntu Linux operating system. The VM currently contains an earlier version of Java. We will update the VM to the latest release of the Java.

All code for this post is available as Gists on GitHub.com, including a complete install script, explained at the end of this post.

Current Version of Java?

First, we will use the ‘update-alternatives –display java’ command to review all the versions of Java currently installed on the VM. We can have multiple copies installed, but only one will be configured and active. We can verify the active version using the ‘java -version’ command.

01 - Check Current Version of Java

Check Current Version of Java

In the above example, the 1.7.0_17 JDK version of Java is configured and active. That version is located in the ‘/usr/lib/jvm/jdk1.7.0_17’ subdirectory. There are two other Java versions also installed but not active, an Oracle 1.7.0_17 JRE version and an older 1.7.0_04 JDK version. These three versions are referred to as ‘alternatives’, thus the ‘alternatives’ command. By selecting an alternative version of Java, we control which java.exe binary executable file the system calls when the ‘java’ command is executed. In a many software development environments, you may need different versions of Java, depending on different client project’s level of technology.

Alternatives

According to About.com, alternatives ‘make it possible for several programs fulfilling the same or similar functions to be installed on a single system at the same time. A generic name in the filesystem is shared by all files providing interchangeable functionality. The alternatives system and the system administrator together determine which actual file is referenced by this generic name. The generic name is not a direct symbolic link to the selected alternative. Instead, it is a symbolic link to a name in the alternatives directory, which in turn is a symbolic link to the actual file referenced.’

We can see this system at work by changing to our ‘/usr/bin’ directory. This directory contains the majority of binary executables on the system. Executing an ‘ls -Al /usr/bin/* | grep -e java -e jar -e appletviewer -e mozilla-javaplugin.so’ command, we see that each Java executable is actually a symbolic link to the alternatives directory, not a binary executable file.

Java Symbolic Links to Alternatives Directory

Java Symbolic Links to Alternatives Directory

To find out all the commands which support alternatives, you can use the ‘update-alternatives –get-selections’ command. We can use a similar command to get just the Java commands, ‘update-alternatives –get-selections | grep -e java -e jar -e appletview -e mozilla-javaplugin.so’.

Java-Related Executable Alternatives

Java-Related Executable Alternatives (view after update)

Computer Architecture?

Next, we need to determine the computer processor architecture of the VM. The architecture determines which version of Java to download. The machine that hosts our VM may have a 64-bit architecture (also known as x86-64, x64, and amd64), while the VM might have a 32-bit architecture (also known as IA-32 or x86). Trying to install 64-bit versions of software onto 32-bit VMs is a common mistake.

The VM’s architecture was originally displayed with the ‘java -version’ command, above. To confirm the 64-bit architecture we can use either the ‘uname -a’ or ‘arch’ command.

02 - Find Your Processor Type

Find Your Processor’s Architecture

JRE or JDK?

One last decision. The Java Runtime Environment (JRE) purpose is to run Java applications. The JRE covers most end-user’s needs. The Java Development Kit (JDK) purpose is to develop Java applications. The JDK includes a complete JRE, plus tools for developing, debugging, and monitoring Java applications. As developers, we will choose to install the JDK.

Download Latest Version

In the above screen grab, you see our VM is running a 64-bit version of Ubuntu 12.04.3 LTS (Precise Pangolin). Therefore, we will download the most recent version of the 64-bit Linux JDK. We could choose either Oracle’s commercial version of Java or the OpenJDK version. According to Oracle, the ‘OpenJDK is an open-source implementation of the Java Platform, Standard Edition (Java SE) specifications’. We will choose the latest commercial version of Oracle’s JDK. At the time of this post, that is JDK 7u45 (aka 1.7.0_45-b18).

The Linux file formats available for download, are a .rpm (Red Hat Package Manager) file and a .tar.gz file (aka tarball). For this post, we will download the tarball, the ‘jdk-7u45-linux-x64.tar.gz’ file.

Current Java JDK Downloads

Current JDK Downloads

Extract Tarball

We will use the command ‘sudo tar -zxvf jdk-7u45-linux-x64.tar.gz -C /usr/lib/jvm’, to extract the files directly to the ‘/usr/lib/jvm’ folder. This folder contains all previously installed versions of Java. Once the tarball’s files are extracted, we should see a new directory containing the new version of Java, ‘jdk1.7.0_45’, in the ‘/usr/lib/jvm’ directory.

04 - Versions of Java on the VM

Versions of Java on the VM

Installation

There are two configuration modes available in the alternatives system, manual and automatic mode. According to die.net‘when a link group is in manual mode, the alternatives system will not (automatically) make any changes to the system administrator’s settings’. When a link group is in automatic mode, the alternatives system ensures that the links in the group point to the highest priority alternatives appropriate for the group’.

We will first install and configure the new version of Java in manual mode. To install the new version of Java, we run ‘update-alternatives –install /usr/bin/java java /usr/lib/jvm/jdk1.7.0_45/jre/bin/java 4’. Note the last parameter, ‘4’, the priority. Why ‘4’? If we chose to use automatic mode, as we will a little later, we want our new Java version to have the highest numeric priority. In automatic mode, the system looks at the priority to determine which version of Java it will run. In the post’s first screen grab, note each of the three installed Java versions had different priorities: 1, 2, and 3. If we want to use automatic mode later, we must set a higher priority on our new version of Java, ‘4’ or greater. We will set it now as part of the install, so we can use it later in automatic mode.

Configuration

First, to configure (activate) the new Java version in alternatives manual mode, we will run ‘update-alternatives –config java’. We are prompted to choose from the list of alternatives for Java executables (java.exe), which has now grown from three to four choices. Choose the new JDK version of Java, which we just installed.

That’s it. The system has been instructed to use the version we selected as the Java alternative. Now, when we run the ‘java’ command, the system will access the newly configured JDK version. To verify, we rerun the ‘java -version’ command. The version of Java has changed since the first time we ran the command (see first screen grab).

05 - Install and Configure New Version of Java

Install and Configure New Version of Java

Now let’s switch to automatic mode. To switch to automatic mode, we use ‘update-alternatives –auto java’. Notice how the mode has changed in the screen grab below and our version with the highest priority is selected.

06c - Switching to Auto

Switching to Auto

Other Java Command Alternatives

We will repeat this process for the other Java-related executables. Many are part of the JDK Tools and Utilities. Java-related executables include the Javadoc Tool (javadoc), Java Web Start (javaws), Java Compiler (javac), and Java Archive Tool (jar), javap, javah, appletviewer, and the Java Plugin for Linux. Note if you are updating a headless VM, you would not have a web browser installed. Therefore it would not be necessary to configuring the mozilla-javaplugin.

06b - Configure Java Plug-in for Linux

Configure Java Plug-in for Linux

Verify Java Version

Verify Java Version is Latest

JAVA_HOME

Many applications which need the JDK/JRE to run, look up the JAVA_HOME environment variable for the location of the Java compiler/interpreter. The most common approach is to hard-wire the JAVA_HOME variable to the current JDK directory. User the ‘sudo nano ~/.bashrc’ command to open the bashrc file. Add or modify the following line, ‘export JAVA_HOME=/usr/lib/jvm/jdk1.7.0_45’. Remember to also add the java executable path to the PATH variable, ‘export PATH=$PATH:$JAVA_HOME/bin’. Lastly, execute a ‘bash –login’ command for the changes to be visible in the current session.

Alternately, we could use a symbolic link to ‘default-java’. There are several good posts on the Internet on using the ‘default-java’ link.

Complete Scripted Example

Below is a complete script to install or update the latest JDK on Ubuntu. Simply download the tarball to your home directory, along with the below script, available on GitHub. Execute the script with a ‘sh install_java_complete.sh’. All java executables will be installed and configured as alternatives in automatic mode. The JAVA_HOME and PATH environment variables will also be set.

Below is a test of the script on a fresh Vagrant VM of an Ubuntu Cloud Image of Ubuntu Server 13.10 (Saucy Salamander). Ubuntu Cloud Images are pre-installed disk images that have been customized by Ubuntu engineering to run on cloud-platforms such as Amazon EC2, Openstack, Windows, LXC, and Vagrant. The script was able to successfully install and configure the JDK, as well as the  JAVA_HOME and PATH environment variables.

Test New Install on Vagrant Ubuntu VM

Test New Install on Vagrant Ubuntu VM

Deleting Old Versions?

Before deciding to completely delete previously installed versions of Java from the ‘/usr/lib/jvm’ directory, ensure there are no links to those versions from OS and application configuration files. Many applications, such as NetBeans, eclipse, soapUI, and WebLogic Server, may contain their own Java configurations. If they don’t use the JAVA_HOME variable, they should be updated to reflect the current active Java version when possible.

Resources

Ubuntu Linux: Install Latest Oracle Java 7

update-alternatives(8) – Linux man page

Configuring different JDKs with alternatives

Ubuntu Documentation: Java

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